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Thread: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

  1. #16
    Ausfish Addict Chimo's Avatar
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    Jun 2006
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    Gold Coast

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Your comment on trim tabs is interesting.
    When I fitted them to my Seafarer Vagabond or actually Seafarer fitted them I was advised by Lindsay Fry to fit 9 by 9 and not bigger ones. I certainly run my twin 115 hps trimmed further up even with the tabs fully raised. The Raker props (20') dont mind surface piercing either as opposed to Vipers or similar.
    Ranmar850 's comments really ring true especially when one speeds up and with minimal tab down and the boat level side to side a Vag bow really does punch thru waves and with the twins and a bunch of heavy batteries etc it does land stern first not that I try and get airborne with it.

    Interesting topic anyhoo, and it does reinforce the fact that one never really learns all there is to know about getting the best out of ones boats.
    What could go wrong.......................

  2. #17

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    What it all amounts to has been mentioned hundreds of times, it's all about compromise, everyone wants a smooth ride, great stability, the fishing access if a centre console, the protection of a full cabin, the ventilation of a canopy, a full kitchen and full bunks, the ability to walk to the bow, 50knots with great fuel economy, be able to tow with a mini, but when it all comes down to it, you can't have all those things, pick the ones that matter most to YOU and go from there.

  3. #18

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    What is good with todays technology is you can have a fibreglass boat built with thermolite so you have the same level of low maintenance hull just like a aluminium hull (no timber to rot so no rebuilds in the future) plus u get that magnificent offshore ride, i was out in my tinny the other day outside .5m swell doing 40kph no bang bang nonsense i thought it drive awesome than i hit some other blokes wake at about 30kph and she banged and it ruined my smile glad i was at the back bench seat my uncle was up the front poor bugger

  4. #19

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    My 6.25 platey was a very different and way better boat with trim tabs. ><>

    Similarly my 4.3 when a Permatrim was added.


    LP
    Kingfisher Painting Solutions:- Domestic and Commercial.

    For further information, contact details, quotes or advice - Click Here





  5. #20

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Boats are all different, some benefit from add ons, some don't, some well known "legendary" boats are really no better than some of the lesser known brands, for a few years I had an old model Seafarer Viking, and while it was at best an OK boat, it in no way deserved the reputation they had, I owned it because I was working in the industry and we sold them. This is only one of two pictures I have of it. A guy I know has a "legendary" old hull, professionally rebuilt to a centre console, with a 300HP Yamaha on it, and in a race, it would be hard to beat, but as a fishing boat, it would not be on my mind, it's a shit thing in a lot of ways, but, it looks fantastic.......
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #21

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Quote Originally Posted by Noelm View Post
    What it all amounts to has been mentioned hundreds of times, it's all about compromise, everyone wants a smooth ride, great stability, the fishing access if a centre console, the protection of a full cabin, the ventilation of a canopy, a full kitchen and full bunks, the ability to walk to the bow, 50knots with great fuel economy, be able to tow with a mini, but when it all comes down to it, you can't have all those things, pick the ones that matter most to YOU and go from there.
    This is the most accurate post here.

    Try taking a house boat out in Moreton bay in a typical 15knot South Easter. Then try spending a week living in a canoe.


  7. #22
    Ausfish Addict disorderly's Avatar
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    Sep 2006
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    In the Jungle

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Quote Originally Posted by TheRealAndy View Post
    This is the most accurate post here.

    Try taking a house boat out in Moreton bay in a typical 15knot South Easter. Then try spending a week living in a canoe.
    Yeah I totally agree...Its a pointless discussion without first determining the intended usage and location.

    Nice Tuna BTW Noel..I bet that was a fun day...

  8. #23

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Yeah it was a decent one, 71KG on Snapper gear....in the dark, on my own!

  9. #24

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Quote Originally Posted by disorderly View Post
    Yeah I totally agree...Its a pointless discussion without first determining the intended usage and location.

    Nice Tuna BTW Noel..I bet that was a fun day...
    Iím not so sure thatís true if the only limitations are the 3.5T/2.5m beam on a trailer boat these days.

    for the longest time I was settled on that I would need to go plate to fit my need for the ultimate offshore trailer boat. It was true for a time in Australia, With the above criteria.

    Then composites made a big come back in the weight stakes. Vacuuming and composite cores meant that not only could they pop out hulls with bends/curves that canít be done in ally, but hulls could be made lighter and/or be made the same with much more fuel/water/batteries on board to still fit within that criteria.

    Just look at the sheer amount of 23ft Shark Cat rebuilds that have been on these pages over the years. Imagine the same hull was built with coosa but had 50-70% more fuel and larger pods to suit bigger four strokes. Same trailerable weight, same offshore ride but a shed load more range and economy.

    had the composites evolution happened earlier, Iíd suggest the massive plate boat rage would never have happened bar a few niche examples.
    Democracy: Simply a system that allows the 51% to steal from the other 49%.

  10. #25

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    That's possibly true, BUT....there's other reason people go alloy (right or wrong) the perception that it's better for pulling up on beaches/rocks, alloy has a slight advantage when doing modifications, weld something on in minutes, don't like it, grind it off and you can't even tell it was there in the first place, it's easier to custom build alloy (kind of) I do see what you mean though, the old 23' Sharkcat was a beast of a boat, but it's sheer size and weight dictated limited rec appeal, huge fuel guzzling two strokes, trucks to tow them, and basically nothing as far as fitout goes, and at the time, astronomical initial cost, and they were hardly "pretty" to look at.

  11. #26

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    It might even come down to " bang for buck ".

    For the budget of a larger platey, you don't get much glass boat.

    The 7 mtr plateys are returning some great fuel figures, particularly in the Suzuki's.

    Massive cockpits that will accommodate 4 crew with ease. And usually ( not all ) have higher sides internally than glass.

    Noel is also on the money when it comes to modifications. Let's also not forget the stress I have seen glass boat skippers go through when doing their trailer drive on at the ramp.

    cheers LP
    Kingfisher Painting Solutions:- Domestic and Commercial.

    For further information, contact details, quotes or advice - Click Here





  12. #27

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    I guess to go back to the question on purpose for me itís predominantly reasonably close offshore fishing/spearing 2 or 3up but generally in fairly average conditions. Maybe up to a 20k run up the coast one way.

    Does also get used to pull the kids on the tube and family days on the lake so the Haines 17 does the top part well (but 3up gets a bit tight) however would prefer more room for the family for the social stuff. Haines ok for room as no seating but the wife would prefer something more comfortable then the big esky with a cushion or the weatherproof bean bag.

    Plates would give me the extra room without hitting as hard on the wallet and on the weight for towing/single handed launching but itís first and foremost a fishing ride hence why I donít want to compromise on ride. Thatís why say a Haines V19 seems to be about the right middle ground.

    On a complete tangent, Iím curious as to whether people have feedback on stern drives?

    Not worth starting a new topic but the brother in law asked me about one he saw for sale this morning and immediate response was that inboards are for ski boats or family cruisers - but then told him I couldnít really justify this mindset other than I guess Iíve always been an outboard man, apart from the obvious loss of deck space with an inboard. Thoughts?

  13. #28
    Ausfish Addict Chimo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Gold Coast

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    It sounds like you really want a Seafarer Vagabond with a glass hardtop and sunbrella rear awning for total deck shade like mine.

    PS I believe you could be correct about inboards too.
    What could go wrong.......................

  14. #29

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Hi just closing off this thread - new boat purchased and stuck with good old fibreglass

  15. #30

    Re: fibreglass vs larger plate ally

    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrad stevenson View Post
    Hi just closing off this thread - new boat purchased and stuck with good old fibreglass
    pics or it never happened 😂
    Democracy: Simply a system that allows the 51% to steal from the other 49%.

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