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Thread: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

  1. #91
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by chris69 View Post
    Giddyup tell me how does the basalt glass wet out compered to chop strand or Double bias i seen it but never worked with it,it looked like a piece of carbon sandwiched between fiberglass.

    Going what ive seen the basalt is so much tougher than normal fiberglass,if there mixed some innigera in with it that would be a great external skin to have in a boat hull.
    Wet out is very easy. Much easier than any fiberglass product I have used. Probably easier than carbon.
    The thicker of the 2 basalts (called Twill) is about 225gsm and is apparently stronger than 600DB. I chose to apply 3 laminates with epoxy (no CSM needed between layers), to attach the outside skin of the pod.
    I had earlier attached the bunk tops in the cabin and the inside laminate of the cabin bulkhead with 1 laminate of basalt and a 225gsm choppy backing (poly resin). Reasoning was that I am testing the glass and if it fails in those areas, it will be very easy to effect repairs.

    The look of it is very disappointing. It ends up a dun dark brown and doesn't look anything special, but I am assured that it is phenomenally strong.
    Again, time will tell.

  2. #92
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    YIPPI-KAI-AY!

    Finally got the lid on the pod.

    The water tank has slowed things down somewhat, but I think at the end of the day, it was time well spent.
    To get water from the tank, I drilled a 1' hole as low as I could get it through the transom (of the boat) into the water tank.
    That was then filled with epoxy glue, which was successful after 2 goes...
    Next, I drilled out a 16mm hole through the epoxy "plug" and ran a tapered tap down it to screw in a BSP 1/2" male thread hose tail.

    That all went well, so next step was to coat the entire tank with epoxy flowcoat, which is food grade, so we can drink the water..

    Gave it all a good hand sand, acetone wipe and taped off all glue surfaces:
    IMG_1385.jpg IMG_1386.jpg

    Applied the epoxy flow coat:
    IMG_1389.jpg IMG_1388.jpg

    Applied liberal amounts of epoxy glue, and sat the lid on, weighted down with a couple blocks:
    IMG_1390.jpg IMG_1391.jpg

    Next job will be to glass the lid on. I'll probably use triple layers of basalt and epoxy.

  3. #93

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    I always wondered how boat builders manage to glass down the floors to all the floor supports? Any insights on how hats done?
    Democracy: Simply a system that allows the 51% to steal from the other 49%.

  4. #94
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Lovey80 View Post
    I always wondered how boat builders manage to glass down the floors to all the floor supports? Any insights on how hats done?
    Can't.
    If there's no access, there's no effective glassing.
    Epoxy glue is about as good as can be done.
    I used to think that the floor should be screwed off as well, but I've changed my thinking as I have seen floors rot around the screws, even though the whole top of the floor was glassed after it was screwed down.
    Vinyl glue is also very strong, but not as strong as epoxy.
    Some boats I've pulled apart had a layer of wet choppy on top of the stringers and the floor was nailed to that, (sometimes copper nails, however most builders from the old days just used mild steel), but in most cases, there was little or no adhesion.

  5. #95
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Very happy with today's effort.

    The lid/duckboard is finally fixed to pod and boat:

    IMG_1392.jpg IMG_1395.jpg

    I'm so impressed with the basalt fibre.
    It is, without doubt, the easiest "glass" I have ever used.

    Check this out:
    IMG_1394.jpg IMG_1396.jpg

    It seems capable of going around any corner or compound curve. None of the laminates in the above photos needed any relief cuts.
    Just a joy to use.

    That brings us to a stage where the structure of the boat is nearly done.

    All I need to do now is increase the size of the anchor locker to fit a GX1 LSM drum winch under the deck and to attend to the pod to bottom of hull join.
    I'll look after the latter when I get the boat higher off the ground to facilitate preparing and painting the hull. It will need a decent grind to get the glass work below the level of the existing structute, so it can then be filled and faired.

    If it doesn't look like it was done in the factory, I haven't tried hard enough...

  6. #96

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    When I did my floor years ago (and it still perfect today) I just mixed up some "bog" resin and talc, spread it liberally on the floor supports, then placed the floor down and screwed with big stainless countersunk screws. I have seen it done with chopped strand strips placed on the supports and the floor placed on that, but doing it on your own you need to be confident with your fit and mixture.

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