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Thread: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

  1. #61
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Hi all.

    Crappy weather in Brisbane recently, but a couple of fine days dried the place out and I got a bit done.

    1st order of business was to finally get rid of the remnants of the nasty hook at the aft end of the port spray chine.
    This was fixed by scribing and strategically tabbing in an upright against the side from the aft bulkhead. That's the one about 300mm in front of the transom.
    The side of the hull had sucked in down low near the chine, so I glassed the foot of the upright where it met the bulkhead and the top 150mm on both sides of the upright.
    This left the centre and bottom of the upright unattached, so after the tabbing had dried, (next day to ensure adhesion and strength), I fitted a couple of wedges and pushed the hull out to where it needed to be to take the suck out of the chine. Used the multi tool to flush off the wedge, then glassed it in place, quite heavily.
    Repeated the process on the other side, which was nowhere near as bad, and now it's all good and very no more twisted chines.

    I needed to get the cabin bulkhead glassed in on the cockpit side, so that went pretty quickly. Nothing special - 150mm wide 225csm choppy backing 150mm wide 600DB.
    As soon as that was dry, I got into the cockpit floor to chine join.

    Being a very early reverse chine model, I made the new floor land on top of the chine, so there was a rather large cavity to cove to allow proper glassing.
    I mixed up some poly bog, 50/50 Talc and Aerosil as thickeners, making a 2 litre tub. Poly fillers are easy to use, as the compound can be pre-mixed and post-hardened, unlike epoxy, which can not.
    So mix as much as you think you need to minimise waste.

    That happened pretty quickly:
    IMG_1289.jpg IMG_1288.jpg

    Rather than finish glassing the top of the floor, I chose to use the fair weather to get some timber work done.

    You may recall that the early Haines boats had "flotation chambers" along the sides of the cockpit.
    In this boat, it was a 150 x 250 "L" shaped box section placed where I put the outer stringer and finishing 250mm up the side of the hull.
    I chose to lift the floor 75mm to bring the floor to chine height, and given that there was more than adequate buoyancy under the floor, and the fact that I did not want a silly full length chamber encroaching on foot room, I decided to glass a shelf 130mm up from the floor, giving plenty of toe room.

    That's a bit trickier than it seems, as there is a distinct curve to the boat at this point, and for the side pockets to sit correctly, the curve must be faithfully replicated where the shelf meets the hull and where the shelf meets the side pocket.

    Also, there was another shelf at the beginning of the cabin structure on both sides, but there was nothing too technical about them.
    I would have happily Epoxy sealed them, but the fact that flow coat wouldn't stick meant they had to be glassed...

    After they were all scribed and fitted properly, I sealed the ply with a 225csm choppy layer on both sides in preparation for permanently glassing in.

    IMG_1291.jpg IMG_1290.jpg

    None of the shelves are glassed in yet, as I need to finish glassing the top of the cockpit floors, which I'd like to return 100mm up the sides of the hull, just to be sure that stress fractures don't appear further down the track.

    Once that's done, I can set about permanently attaching the shelves, finishing the rear floor, preparing the side pockets and making the dash look like it's not an afterthought. Then there's a pod to build (maybe), and then it should be structurally finished.

    Doesn't sound like much...

    Coupl'a days...

    If only...

  2. #62

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    What about making the ones up the front fully enclosed (up to the deck underside)and putting a plastic hatch cover on them, just to make some waterproof storage for "stuff" that you want to keep dry? Maybe even go extra flash and divide it in half and put two hatches and a cross shelf to hold things like your wallet, keys and phone, like a glove box kind of.

  3. #63
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Noelm View Post
    What about making the ones up the front fully enclosed (up to the deck underside)and putting a plastic hatch cover on them, just to make some waterproof storage for "stuff" that you want to keep dry? Maybe even go extra flash and divide it in half and put two hatches and a cross shelf to hold things like your wallet, keys and phone, like a glove box kind of.
    What a great idea Noel.
    Thanks for that.
    Keep an eye out...

  4. #64

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    You can never have too many storage spots, even one of those recessed fire extinguisher things can be accommodated for, the ones with the white plastic liner and the clear lid, keeps everything clean and dry, plus looks neat and tidy, and most of those things are really quite cheap

  5. #65
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Hi all.

    Got a bit done in the last few days:

    I got a layer of 225 choppy and basalt glass over the cockpit floors and returned them 100mm up the side of the hull.
    IMG_1295.jpg IMG_1303.jpg

    I then placed the side pocket shelves, which had already been glassed top and bottom, onto spacers and glassed them to the hull sides:
    IMG_1305.jpg IMG_1304.jpg

    The cockpit floors hadn't been continued to the transom, as I was waiting to make up my mind about what I was going to do about mounting the motor, as if I decided to do a full width hull extension, I wanted unencumbered access to all of the transom.
    I ended up deciding on a very narrow 600mm wide hull extension, which corresponds to the distance between the 2 inner stringers.

    So I got the outer floors prepped, (fitted properly and glassed underneath) and on the port side I fabricated and glassed on retainers for the oil tank.
    IMG_1308(Edited).jpg

    Then it was time to get serious about the hull extension.
    Spent a fair bit of time measuring and making 100% sure the boat was sitting dead level according to the hull, not the deck. Just happens that the 2 figures agreed, but I couldn't have known that if I hadn't worked it out. The electronic level more than paid for itself...

    I grabbed a full sheet of 16mm melamine to fabricate the mould and cut all the bits to size.
    The piece for the bottom of the "pod" had to have 3/4 depth cuts every 25mm for its length so the melamine would bend smoothly without faceting.
    IMG_1310.jpg

    Had a bit of a think about attaching the bottom hull extension piece to the hull and decided to block and wedge it into place, which should be more than enough until there is sufficient glass to hold the shape.

    Next, I had to fill in the transom skin of the old sterndrive penetration hole, so I laid up a 5mm thick fiberglass sheet (transom outer glass skin thickness), which was then scribed and epoxied in place, after the whole area was ground (for pod attachment) and cleaned off:
    IMG_1309.jpg

    Next step - get that hull extension done...

  6. #66
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    I got stuck into the pod yesterday.

    Spent a lot of time rechecking measurements and finally bit the bullet and put the mould in place.
    The fastest way to do it was to put a single screw through the hull on the keel line into the bottom of the mould. That held everything in place so it could then be wedged and fiddled a bit.

    The dimensions of the hull extension are 600 wide (to line up with stringers), 625 high (25" transom) and 450 long at top and 435 at bottom. I give that little bit extra length on top to put a little more transom angle on so the leg can tuck under a bit more to get onto the plane quicker.

    Haven't laid up a hull extension or a pod in quite a while, and I had forgotten what a slow and tedious job it was.

    I started with a 600gsm layer of choppy, followed by a layer of mat-back 225/450D/B then another 450 choppy.
    All intersects (hull to pod, sides to transom) copped a 150 wide 225/450 as well.

    IMG_1311.jpg IMG_1312.jpg IMG_1313.jpg

    So far, that's a total of about 1,700gsm and the intention is for at least 9,000gsm.
    That was the thickness (separated mid layup by 18mm ply on the sides and 36mm on transom), that I used on my 24' Mustang which has copped a flogging from a 300 Suzuki for the last 5 years.

    The weather gods have been unkind today and it's silly to lay up in the rain, so I'll just have to wait...

    But I don't do "wait" very well...

  7. #67
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Please see below.
    This was a gaff...
    Last edited by giddyup58; 19-04-2021 at 08:53 PM. Reason: Mistakenly posted

  8. #68
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Hi all.

    I had a fairly good run at the pod over the weekend.

    In order to speed up the glassing, I cut out cardboard templates of the bottom sides and rear (transom) of the pod, and then pre cut all of the glass needed to get to the 1/2 way point - around 4,500gsm to 5,000gsm.

    It certainly sped up the glassing, and I was able to get 4 choppies and 4 DB down in pretty quick order, giving a total of 5,100gsm
    IMG_1316.jpg IMG_1317.jpg

    I had a time to prepare a couple pieces of 18mm marine ply for the transom core, so I cut them to the right shape, and bevelled the edges to make glassing easy and epoxied the bits together:
    IMG_1314.jpg IMG_1315.jpg

    The way I do my ply cores, is to make them smaller than the actual transom, so there is plenty of room around the full perimeter of the core (ply) for glassing to the the inner skin. That's why there is such a heavy bevel on the core timbers. Also, all of the end grain is fully protected and the mechanical join to the hull is (IMO) much stronger if we come off the core, onto the transom skin, then 90 degree turn and at least 100mm onto the side/bottom of the hull. I've been doing this for years and never had a problem. Some guys try to make the core "fit" the area exactly. Why? A nice heavy build up of glass is far superior, provided everything is prepared properly.

    So next time I get to play, the new transom will be epoxied to the pod transom and I will make up stringer extensions and epoxy them in too. They will simply attach to the sides of the pod. The floor of the pod,(bottom of hull extension), will be strengthened by a couple of stringers which will be fitted once the rest of the pod is finished being glassed - another 4 - 5 double choppy/DB layers.

    More pic's soon, hopefully.

  9. #69
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Hi all.

    Today I didn't get too much time, but I did manage to grind the whole pod out, (no shiney), made the stringer extensions and epoxy glued them and the new transom core in:
    IMG_1318.jpg IMG_1319.jpg IMG_1320.jpg

    Leave overnight to set, and hopefully I can get some more glass on tomorrow afternoon.
    It needs 4 - 5 laminates of 450csm choppy and 600csm DB, and it will be a challenge to get it all on tomorrow afternoon. It takes a fair while to cut out all the glass and longer again to get it all down without overheating.
    But if I can get it all down, I won't have to grind it all out again to finish off.
    I always use waxed resin and although the suppliers say one can laminate without sanding within 24 hours, I feel safer if there's no shiney...

  10. #70

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    You certainly don't waste time. I couldn't see your latest pics.

  11. #71

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    same, no pics!

  12. #72

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by giddyup58 View Post
    I always use waxed resin and although the suppliers say one can laminate without sanding within 24 hours, I feel safer if there's no shiney...
    Any particular reason that you don't use unwaxed and just add wax to the final layer? I'd have thought the tacky surface after one session of layup has set off would just help grab the glass (for positioning purposes) when starting the next layup session?

  13. #73
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Mopheus View Post
    Any particular reason that you don't use unwaxed and just add wax to the final layer? I'd have thought the tacky surface after one session of layup has set off would just help grab the glass (for positioning purposes) when starting the next layup session?
    I used to do it that way, but for the last few years I have gone to the waxed resin, mainly because being the crap resin that it is, it really needs a good grind and acetone clean to make anything stick.
    It forces me to grind and not "trust" that it will stick.
    OCD I guess, but it works for me...
    As for making the next session 1st glass stick, I always wet out the job first.
    I can see the value when (for example) laying up the hull in a mould for a 35'er. Who'd want to grind that out from day to day to get the next layers on?
    But these little repairs involve so little laminating that the grinding of fresh waxed resin is kept to a minimum.
    I've probably done preparatory grinding of fresh work for less than 30 minutes on this job.

  14. #74

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    I agree Giddy. I prefer a mechanical bond instead of unwaxed chemical bond. Just my opinion also. Its not that hard to sand . I always sand back any dags of glass in a laminate prior to doing another layer even with unwaxed resin otherwise you risk creating air bubbles.
    Mick
    Not all tools are usefull.
    Nappies and politicians should be changed regularly for the same reason..

  15. #75
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Brisbane
    Thread Starter

    Re: Haines Hunter V19C rebuild

    Hi all.

    I finished laying up the pod today.
    The skin thicknesses ended up at 8mm for the outside skin and 6mm for the inside.
    Total of over 9,000gsm
    IMG_1326.jpg IMG_1327.jpg

    I prepared a stringer to glass in as a continuation of the keel, but I want to give a bit more thought to what I'm actually going to do with all this space.

    Here it sits, unattached:
    IMG_1328.jpg

    Next job is to glass the outside to the boat and then see about making a mould to close hole and form a pair of swim platforms.

    In the interim of course, I will source some 50x10 alloy strap and 1/2' S/S bolts to bolt the pod on. The glass will most likely be adequate, but I've always bolted them as well and never had a failure...

    More soon.

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