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Thread: ventilate engine pods

  1. #76

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Micky you have a couple option from kennards hire you can hire there pinless moisture meter (not cheap)

    https://www.kennards.com.au/moisture...ms=581-1-2-100

    Or from what i just seen u can hire there FLIR camera to detect moisture

    https://www.kennards.com.au/test-and...al-camera.html

    Those links above may help out many other boaters on the market for a new rig too

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  2. #77

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Just catching up on the puzzle....I have quite a few books on boat repair ..mainly more yachts than power boats...and cored construction is pretty common in the sail world.A couple more simple tests that cost nothing!..Dry your hulls out....well I think you have done that already...then get some squares of plastic film and tape them onto various places on the inside of the pod.Leave the hull out in the sun for a day and check to see if you get any condensation on the inside of the plastic film.If you do have...no need to investigate further...youre in a rebuild situation.

    Secondly tap the bulkheads they should "ring".. if you get a hollow or dead noise on any tap..again thats enough.There is also info on the use of IR but frankly I reckon your moving into boat builder territory...

    Just another thought on the way..Im kinda always surprised power boats seem to have so many enclosed spaces...seems to me to be a recipe for rot... for day use small boats we always used to leave the inspection ports open to allow air to circulate just closing them up when going out.Again I would ask whether putting an inspection port in the bulkhead and leaving that open when the boat is moored would be enough ventilation anyway....and you could have a watertight pod when at sea....

  3. #78

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    1. I like the plastic film idea. Will make it part of the testing experiments.
    I have put in an effort to get the Pods bone dry. They are dusty dry right now.
    The idea of an inspection port in the bulkhead to leave open in port seems good. My original question was "would holes in the bulkhead fix the condensate problem."
    With a lot of help from all the contributors above it seems that:
    1. I need to make sure there is no excess moisture in the ply.
    2. If one above is ok your idea of an inspection hatch sounds good.

    I will still need to sand the ply a bit to remove soft wood. But i am hoping i have gotten most of it allready.
    Quote Originally Posted by inveratta View Post
    Just catching up on the puzzle....I have quite a few books on boat repair ..mainly more yachts than power boats...and cored construction is pretty common in the sail world.A couple more simple tests that cost nothing!..Dry your hulls out....well I think you have done that already...then get some squares of plastic film and tape them onto various places on the inside of the pod.Leave the hull out in the sun for a day and check to see if you get any condensation on the inside of the plastic film.If you do have...no need to investigate further...youre in a rebuild situation.

    Secondly tap the bulkheads they should "ring".. if you get a hollow or dead noise on any tap..again thats enough.There is also info on the use of IR but frankly I reckon your moving into boat builder territory...

    Just another thought on the way..Im kinda always surprised power boats seem to have so many enclosed spaces...seems to me to be a recipe for rot... for day use small boats we always used to leave the inspection ports open to allow air to circulate just closing them up when going out.Again I would ask whether putting an inspection port in the bulkhead and leaving that open when the boat is moored would be enough ventilation anyway....and you could have a watertight pod when at sea....
    Sent from my SM-G960F using Ausfish mobile app

  4. #79

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Thermal imaging is something i have seen electricians use. It probably would show up the extent of the wet ply patches.
    Will try the other sugestions first.

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  5. #80

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    ok...just need to tape all four edges of the plastic well so condensate is trapped!

  6. #81
    Ausfish Addict Chimo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Gold Coast

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Micky

    Not sure if you have ever spent any time watching SV Zingaro on YouTube but if not the near loss of the boat is interesting.

    Off shore from Hawaii and the stbd hull decided to part company. It seems the frp etc was all OK but the glue in the marine ply ceased to be working so in big seas the sh%t hit the fan.

    If the pods you have have any glue suspect issues then as Inveratta suggested it may be time for some serious rebuild with non ply material.

    Just a thought and the story of the near disaster but for their great seaman ship is worth a look anyhoo.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJvD_1z3zQU&list=PLYK_-XEJdbbRgQ8bWcEiUMQXN61kN_0hK



    Cheers
    Chimo
    What could go wrong.......................

  7. #82

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Gotta love owning a timber boat.

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  8. #83

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Thermal imaging would be tough to get sensible data from. You'd probably need to image from inside the pods and, due to their thin walls, it'd be difficult to know whether you were seeing evaporative cooling or just a reflection of differing external conditions.

    The black plastic idea is a good one - it's a simple method often used on concrete slabs to check if they've dried out after water inundation or to check for rising damp.

    Personally I'd get a surveyor to check it out. Your choice though.

  9. #84

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Ok I will throw my 10 cents worth in here I've what I know.

    Fist off any boat hull either made from fiberglass, cement, steel, aluminium or timber with sealed compartments will be trouble. Yes water condensation will be present in a sealed compartment. To what amount is a science project itself and there are many different theories to just how much water will be produced. Before the mathematicians and goggle experts start, real life I have seen water from sealed compartments that I couldn't believe and that's after doing a pressure test on the compartment with no loss of pressure. That is also on a aluminum hull so that rules out water retention in a timber combination.


    Second, any compartment having a inspection/breathing hole is very appropriate. This relates to whether the boat is permanently in the water or out. Adding fans and whatever is just crazy.

    I could go on more with this subject but in the end it all comes down to the design from the builder and if they have decided that they are going to install sealed compartments that you can't access you should find a different builder. This issue has always been a problem with production boats. It's the old story, you get what you pay for. Every boat should have access to compartments, but this is not the way unless you are getting something custom built where they look a little closer at items as such.

    Having ventilation in a boat is a positive. Like someone has said it's strange how sailing vessels have inspection/ventilation ports built in, but power vessels seem to disregard this principle. The boat I am currently restoring followed the same stupid idea of sealed compartments which I have installed inspection ports. You can't beat ventilation full stop.

    I will get the crash helmet on and be ready for the response.

  10. #85

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Thanks Brett,
    I guess the inspection hatches in the wells were suposed to be open when the boat was not at sea.
    Thats just not practical as the hatches are also open to rain.
    New small inspection hatches in the bulkhead seems like a practical solution. After the Experiments.
    If the ply is wet wherw i cant see it, it will be uncovered with the testing.
    If its dry. Small hatches in the bulkhead looks like a winner.
    Quote Originally Posted by brett62 View Post
    Ok I will throw my 10 cents worth in here I've what I know.

    Fist off any boat hull either made from fiberglass, cement, steel, aluminium or timber with sealed compartments will be trouble. Yes water condensation will be present in a sealed compartment. To what amount is a science project itself and there are many different theories to just how much water will be produced. Before the mathematicians and goggle experts start, real life I have seen water from sealed compartments that I couldn't believe and that's after doing a pressure test on the compartment with no loss of pressure. That is also on a aluminum hull so that rules out water retention in a timber combination.


    Second, any compartment having a inspection/breathing hole is very appropriate. This relates to whether the boat is permanently in the water or out. Adding fans and whatever is just crazy.

    I could go on more with this subject but in the end it all comes down to the design from the builder and if they have decided that they are going to install sealed compartments that you can't access you should find a different builder. This issue has always been a problem with production boats. It's the old story, you get what you pay for. Every boat should have access to compartments, but this is not the way unless you are getting something custom built where they look a little closer at items as such.

    Having ventilation in a boat is a positive. Like someone has said it's strange how sailing vessels have inspection/ventilation ports built in, but power vessels seem to disregard this principle. The boat I am currently restoring followed the same stupid idea of sealed compartments which I have installed inspection ports. You can't beat ventilation full stop.

    I will get the crash helmet on and be ready for the response.
    Sent from my SM-G960F using Ausfish mobile app

  11. #86

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    I Don't think a crash helmet is needed Brett, interesting read..
    It's an interesting thread, and I can relate to it, in regards to my work experience.
    A 5 story building, clad with full length glass and aluminium frames, water was drained via the vertical hollow aluminium frame, with weep holes at various points.
    This new building, without rain in the beginning of winter started having leaking issues... ( way off subject I know)
    Turns out, with high winds, and no protection over the drain/weep holes, the wind pressure was stopping the water in the frame from exiting. But there wasn't really any sufficient rain. The heating for the building had been turned on, winter was approaching quickly. the leaking issues, were due to the condensation build up, inside the frames from the cold temp outside, to the heated building inside. I can't remember what the volume of water they took out on one face of this building ( 20 years ago), but it was astonishing. The drain holes were fitted with deflectors, which allowed the water to flow out un hindered. Condensation is an interesting topic and also interesting in the situations and conditions it can occur.
    Now days, aluminium frames still have drain/weep holes, but most of the frame is foam packed to compensate for the extreme outside inside differential. and insulate more efficiently and dramatically reduces condensation build up in the frame as well.
    I would have thought as well, inspection ports which give ventilation would be the go as well.
    Sorry to go off track on your thread Micky, I hope you get this sorted and come up with a good solution to fix the issue here...

    Col

  12. #87

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Micky outboard pods and areas exposed to the elements can be a issue and a little more involved. We would run pipe with S bends up under gunnels from sealed compartments and also have inspection ports, depending on the size of the compartment we could install several. When we did fully welded sealed decks (self drain) they still got breathers installed and inspection ports.

    Don't be concerned about installing a breather through the transom as it can only benefit the environment caused by sealed compartments.

    Water sitting in any boat no matter what its made from will cause problems over time. That goes for trailer boats and vessels with permanent homes in the water.

    I hope it all works out for you. The glass boat mentioned I am restoring was as wet as a shag under deck, I removed the water and cut inspection holes and it has now dried up and the mould is dead and turned to powder which I have blown out.


    IMG_20190323_114619.jpg

  13. #88

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Thanks Brett
    I may have put the altex wood preserver on too soon. I intend to sand a bit more which may remove the wood preserver
    I think. That effort can be done over time provided the various testing of traped moisture comes back negative.
    I will install the breather pipe.
    Give me a few weeks to get the testing completed. Then i will report here for further help.
    Thanks
    MF
    Quote Originally Posted by brett62 View Post
    Micky outboard pods and areas exposed to the elements can be a issue and a little more involved. We would run pipe with S bends up under gunnels from sealed compartments and also have inspection ports, depending on the size of the compartment we could install several. When we did fully welded sealed decks (self drain) they still got breathers installed and inspection ports.

    Don't be concerned about installing a breather through the transom as it can only benefit the environment caused by sealed compartments.

    Water sitting in any boat no matter what its made from will cause problems over time. That goes for trailer boats and vessels with permanent homes in the water.

    I hope it all works out for you. The glass boat mentioned I am restoring was as wet as a shag under deck, I removed the water and cut inspection holes and it has now dried up and the mould is dead and turned to powder which I have blown out.


    IMG_20190323_114619.jpg
    Sent from my SM-G960F using Ausfish mobile app

  14. #89

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    Micky probably already mentioned but u can get moisture buckets that u can sit inside the pod and the li ittle peble like rocks assorb the water and it leaves the water in the bittom of the container so u can measure the water every second day to see if its drying out

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  15. #90

    Re: ventilate engine pods

    bump....kinda interested where this went.........

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