Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1

    A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    Hot off the press. While I've been plauged by sharks in recent trips I must acknowledge I've never seen a Tiger.

    https://catchmenttocoast.org/2019/09...-expectations/

    Full paper here https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...06320719306020






    Catchment to Coast
    Stories of science from the Australian Rivers Institute
    Search Search for: Menu




    Decline in tiger shark population defies expectations

    September 11, 2019


  2. #2

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    It should be reasonably easy to look up gamefishing club captures during comps to determine some rough numbers, and maybe even look at past numbers compared to now, by far the greatest numbers of Tigers taken by rec anglers would be by the game fishing clubs, and they keep records.

  3. #3

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    There like eating green turtles try on of those for bait and the shark net guys would be keeping record too, there one shark I would not trust ever, the last one I saw was at hinchinbrook island at cape sandwich in 3mts of water at around 14ft in length they will eat you as quick as looking at you.

  4. #4

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    Tigers are actually a pretty cautious critter initially at least. A few mates have dived with them up on the reef - they always seem to hang just out of good camera range. As far as them not being around much in SE Qld any more - bring back whaling and see how long before they turn up. The old Tangalooma whaling station was one of the major drawcards for large oceanic sharks in our region. It would be interesting to see research done into hereditary feeding patterns with large oceanic predators. Hereditary patterns are far from uncommon in marine organisms and I would assume that the whaling station has been closed long enough now that any sharks that did feed there would be long gone and thus not passing on the hereditary "map" as such. It would also explain why numbers were seen to drop off gradually. Just a theory of mine.

  5. #5

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    This is really surprising. While I have only ever seen one Tiger in my time fishing off the Sunshine Coast (it was very big) overall shark numbers are definitely on the up.
    Democracy: Simply a system that allows the 51% to steal from the other 49%.

  6. #6
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Sunshine Coast

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    That would be in line with what I was told by the emu park shark netter, he used to get quite a few every season, hasnít had any for a few years now


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Kevlacat 6.2m
    115 v4 evinrudes (going strong)

  7. #7

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    How accurate is the study, it has been many years since we have been allowed to kill large sharks in Qld.

    How does that decline compare to other species? Snapper etc.

  8. #8

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    I can take them to spots in Moreton bay where there are LOTS of tiger sharks....

    Have had packs of them swimming round my boat numerous times while crabbing, up to 14 - 16 foot long..

    I would say they have increased within the bay not decreased from my experience!

  9. #9

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    I reckon this guy wouldn't be too upset about shark numbers of any kind decreasing.

    2019-09-16 14.17.50.jpg

  10. #10

    Re: A 71% decline in Tiger sharks from 1962 to 2017

    The shark catcher in Townsville still gets plenty of Tigers from around Magnetic Island.
    I saw a big one off Hinchinbrook Island recently. I reckon it was the same one that took the spearfisherman's leg.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Join us