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  1. #1

    Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    Anybody seen any barra lately, very suspicious of something huge smashing mullet at the mouth of the creek on Tuesday. Jumping right out of the water.

  2. #2

    Re: Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    Not Tingalpa creek but had an altercation with a large (about a metre) free swimming fish in knee deep water that had a large yellowish convex tail at Point Halloran while having a wade and flick some time ago. I saw it as it saw me and we both scared shit out each other. They have been caught at Raby Bay and down the Goldy - no reason they couldn't be in Tinny Creek.

  3. #3

    Re: Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    Heaps escaped from Awoonga Dam and Monduran dam in the wets of 2011 and 2013. Mostly bigger ones.

    And they were ALL males being from freshwater even the big ones (that's why impoundments have to be stocked. Barra don't breed in freshwater).

    95% of barramundi head south when exiting an estuary so places like Burnett and Mary rivers had their breeding populations increased significantly once the big ones had taken part in the spawning process as males. After 1 spawning event as males they change sex to females as they "salt up".

    Until the netters in those places find 'em.

    Some kept going south and ended up in Moreton Bay and surrounding creeks.

    However, conditions in those more southern climes don't support breeding so the newcomers die out eventually and are not replaced.

    If you do manage to catch one, let it go. It'll be a unique catch in those stretches of coast.

    Those "things jumping smashing mullet" won't be barra.

    Barra are "suction feeders" and inhale food into their mouths. Have seen barra free-jumping at times (not very often) but not when feeding.

    However, threadfin king are "ram feeders". Simply open their mouths as they move forward with mouth open filtering via the gill cover exits.

    Except when chasing jelly prawns in very shallow water, as they use the 5 "feelers" on each side of gills to herd them from the mud where they shelter and up into mouth. King also "feeler feed" in deeper water towards high tide with their noses on the bottom as their feelers work.

    Next time in threadie territory, look at the exposed mud bottom as the tide drops. You'll see heaps of golf ball sized indentations in the mud. That's from threadie noses resting on the bottom (fish's body vertical) as they "feeler feed".

    King threadfin WILL expose their backs along mudflat edges and sometimes end up on mud in their efforts to feed. Their acrobatics when chasing mullet on creek/estuary edges can be spectacular. Water going in all directions.

    King will pick up a mullet or lure on the move and keep going. If its a vibe or gulp, they'll hit it as its sinking. Unless "in the know" about threadie fishing, you'll wonder what's going on as your line goes slack.

    Barra will hit a lure/live bait with a suction action and immediately turn away. That's why fishers talk about barramundi hitting lures hard. And they certainly do with hard-bodied lures.

    A barra will immediately recognise that a hard lure is not something that it usually has for dinner and the flight reaction kicks in straight away. With the big paddle tail and thick tail wrist, barra can take as much stopping as a tractor. They are powerful.

    The hardest barra fight that you"ll get is from a barra size 85 - 100 cm. Below 85 and they have agility but little bulk. Above 100cm and they have bulk but little agility.

    However, between 85 - 100 they have both, so can be the hardest size to handle (especially in a bit of run).

    With a soft plastic take, it takes a barra a fraction of a second to recognise that, so there's a slight pause before the escape action kicks into play. There'll be an initial jolt caused by the barra's lightning "suck". You'll know immediately that its a barra and then it'll take off.

    If live baiting on the bottom, you'll feel a "tonk" first as the barra inhales the mullet/prawn before any action starts (bit like a soft plastic take).

    Once things settle down to a slogfest, the king threadie will pull a barra backwards. Be prepared for an extended fight with a bigger threadie and don't use baitcasters on bigger threadies (not enough line). Use spinning outfits (more line). Sometimes they don't even know that they're hooked and when they do, they don't give up unlike barra which do after their initial hit, attempt to escape and a bit of a fight.

    Barra are exciting takers of lure/live bait but really pussies in a fight after the initial attempt to escape. THAT'S why you need heavier drags and leaders in an attempt to hold that first initial run.

    Hope that helps a bit.

  4. #4

    Re: Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    Quote Originally Posted by scottar View Post
    Not Tingalpa creek but had an altercation with a large (about a metre) free swimming fish in knee deep water that had a large yellowish convex tail at Point Halloran while having a wade and flick some time ago. I saw it as it saw me and we both scared shit out each other. They have been caught at Raby Bay and down the Goldy - no reason they couldn't be in Tinny Creek.
    We used to hand spear them in the creeks up the territory/cape. When they are on the prowl they light up, kind of like an octopus. They will be perfectly camouflaged except for a bright white stripe down either side of their face - once you know what to look for they stand out like the proverbial.
    nil carborundum illegitimi

  5. #5

    Re: Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    There's heaps of barra in the Northern end of Pumistone Passage especially in the canals of Pelican Waters and there's usually big specimens over the meter mark amongst them. They come down to near the Caloundra bar in December and just circle around and if in the know you'll get one although getting one to strike can be very frustrating. Plenty of smaller ones up near the weirs which is still salt water on incoming tide.

  6. #6

    Re: Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    Plenty being taken on the Goldie particularly near the drains near Bond uni after some rain
    A bad days fishing has got to be better than any day at work......


  7. #7

    Re: Barra in Tingalpa Creek ?

    They can light up can't they, GBC. I must confess to only seeing 1 white stripe down between the eyes when they get excited.

    How big Bluefin? Do you think a breeding colony has been established somewhere (not good odds for that) or are they travellers?

    Did hear of some smaller barra in Bribie Passage in 2015 or so, but could never confirm it.

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