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  1. #1

    Outboard Rebuild

    I am thinking of getting my 2 stroke outboard rebuilt rather than over capitalise on an old boat or take the risk of buying a second hand outboard. I am pretty sure you have to following the running in procedure at per if it was new (extra oil, limits on speed). But what about a 20 hr service? Does it need the cylinder head bolt tensions to be re-checked? Anything else?

  2. #2
    Ausfish Silver Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kalbarri, WA

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    Just basic engine procedures, I would imagine. I can't see why there would be a 20 hour service--no oil to change. Just retorque the head after a while, Check the plugs for signs of lean running, look for leaks. Old two strokes are pretty simple, part of their attraction. Best to get a rebuild kit for the carbs, you don't want to wreck a newly rebuilt motor for the sake of that.

  3. #3

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by ranmar850 View Post
    Just basic engine procedures, I would imagine. I can't see why there would be a 20 hour service--no oil to change. Just retorque the head after a while, Check the plugs for signs of lean running, look for leaks. Old two strokes are pretty simple, part of their attraction. Best to get a rebuild kit for the carbs, you don't want to wreck a newly rebuilt motor for the sake of that.
    Well wouldn't a re-torque of the head constitute a service? You wouldn't need to drop the gearbox oil as is done with a new motor but my thinking was that a lot of the service requirements would be the same at around 20 hrs.

  4. #4

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    Why do you think it needs rebuilding? Any machine work needs to be done by someone who knows outboards, not just an auto machine shop.

  5. #5

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by Noelm View Post
    Why do you think it needs rebuilding? Any machine work needs to be done by someone who knows outboards, not just an auto machine shop.
    I have taken it to a well established marine mechanic. They found low compression in one cylinder and found damage to the piston and bore.

  6. #6

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    I went through a similar situation last year. I found the cost of rebuilding was more than the cost of a decent used outboard (60hp 2stroke) and I thought rebuilding wouldíve been over capitalising. As well as machining bore and needing pistons and rings I also required a crankshaft rebuild. I was looking at spending a couple of grand on a 15 year old motor. I took the line of thought that putting a new outboard on an old hull isnít overcapitalising on the boat as when the hull is past its used bye date iíll Still have a good motor to bolt onto the next hull.

    Also if you tell us the make and model of your motor others might be able to offer more specific advice.

  7. #7

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    Quote Originally Posted by fishizzle View Post
    I went through a similar situation last year. I found the cost of rebuilding was more than the cost of a decent used outboard (60hp 2stroke) and I thought rebuilding wouldíve been over capitalising. As well as machining bore and needing pistons and rings I also required a crankshaft rebuild. I was looking at spending a couple of grand on a 15 year old motor. I took the line of thought that putting a new outboard on an old hull isnít overcapitalising on the boat as when the hull is past its used bye date iíll Still have a good motor to bolt onto the next hull.

    Also if you tell us the make and model of your motor others might be able to offer more specific advice.
    I have considered getting an second hand motor but good one the right hp, weight for an old hull and in good condition are thin on the ground. And on top of that you can't be sure of the condition unlike a professionally re built motor with a warranty. And the rebuild is still a good bit cheaper than buying a second hand motor from what I have seen. By overcapitalising I mean it's a lot of money to spend and still have an old boat and you may not get a reasonable return if you sell in a few years (not many people scrap their hull and keep their motor).

  8. #8

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    in nearly 40yrs of boating I have NEVER seen a rebuild last for long..tolerances are too critical in outboards..they hold high revs for extended periods of time unlike an old two stroke motorbike engine that's revs on an off...don't blow a couple of grand on rebuild that will blow up anyway..get another later model second hand motor you may kick yourself in twelve months when it goes bang otherwise...rick

  9. #9

    Re: Outboard Rebuild

    I had a Johnson 4 cylinder 140 hp 2 stroke that had same issues with one piston and pot. Stripped it down and had the crank checked and it was fine so had re-bored (all cylinders) installed new pistons,rods,bearings and rings. Also got them to shave the heads and then I reassemble the engine and had the motor for another 4 years and used it a lot with no issues and sold it on to a friend who used it for many years later. 2 strokes are not that hard to rebuild and not that expensive for parts. When I brought the parts I shopped around and got the parts for the right price. Just do your homework. I ran the first 10 hours with extra oil in the mix and varied the rev's.

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