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  1. #1

    Snapper guides/books

    So I've gone out to certain reefs on my kayak to try catch some snapper..
    I caught one I think by chance last sunday at raby bay while drifting to shore and trolling a chunk of frozen squid and
    a 37cm squire took it.. nice little fight.

    But that same day I was out in 7m of water on a drop off with reefy/gravel/mud bottom where other yakkers and boats have caught
    from 50-70cm snapper.. Before it I caught some nice whiting, cut one up fresh and stuck it on a 4/0 circle hook like a few videos I seen on youtube
    said to do it.. And nothing for a few hours.. Even did it 1 hr before and after the tide changes..

    So My question is there any good books on Snapper more so around moreton bay.. Most books or videos are for WA or NSW..etc
    Only time I caught a nice size snapper "69cm" was with a pink zman with my dad at mud island in the morning around July about 5 years ago.

    Would love to have some tips..
    oh also this is a pic of the drop off just to show you to see if you think it looks snapper good..

    Attachment 113294

  2. #2

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    There has been a DVD done on Moreton Bay - Moreton Bay Snapper Secrets - quite a while back now - not sure how or where you would find a copy. Also plenty written in the usual local publications. Snapper don't always feed at or near the drop off - if the bottom is right they can be out on the flat stuff. By the same token if a drop off is devoid of food, fish may use it as a highway but not stop and feed. Some of the drop off areas around Raby Bay can be a bit like that - they were as a result of dredging and as a result the drop itself is predominantly mud. The area around the red beacon out the other side of Cleveland point can at times hold good snapper (my PB from there was about 5kg - long time ago though)
    "I soak the worms in rum. The fish love em and the worms die happy"
    "Alcohol is not the solution to your problems...................but then again, neither is milk"

  3. #3

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    Quote Originally Posted by scottar View Post
    There has been a DVD done on Moreton Bay - Moreton Bay Snapper Secrets - quite a while back now - not sure how or where you would find a copy. Also plenty written in the usual local publications.

    See Graham at Wellington Point Marine for a copy of the DVD. Talked to guy who made the DVD at the boat ramp once, the snapper fishing was mostly at Mud Island.

  4. #4

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    Not too sure trolling a chunk of frozen Squid would be my first choice to catch a Snapper. This might seem a little bit harsh, and maybe even old fashioned, but to me, looking at YouTube movies and stuff like that is not the best way to learn how to fish (not saying its wrong) but to me, actually doing it regularly beats watching 100 movies and reading 100 magazines (in my opinion)

  5. #5

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    G'day greekboi
    Hard to tell I guess not knowing the depth of the screen shot, doesn't look like snapper to me. I get everything from a mass of arches to individual arches
    Were I fish in SA the fish tend to be in the drop offs when the tide is running and move to the top of the drops on slack tide
    My main technique for catching snapper is to motor around till I've found them and then drift over them. If they are there and hungry they eat anything, including a bit of plastic that looks like a fish or a squid head you left in the boat from last trip. I mostly use chunks of herring or by catch
    It can also be productive to anchor and fish offal berley up, maybe not in a yak though
    Cheers
    Rod

  6. #6

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    Yea it is a lil harsh.. but I wasn't doing it to catch anything really.. I was heaps tired and on my way back to shore.. was out from 4am to 2pm and did around 9km. Which on a kayak is a bit. The squid was just on my hook while while it was in my trolling rod holder.. To me getting the snapper doing that was lucky..

    Quote Originally Posted by Noelm View Post
    Not too sure trolling a chunk of frozen Squid would be my first choice to catch a Snapper. This might seem a little bit harsh, and maybe even old fashioned, but to me, looking at YouTube movies and stuff like that is not the best way to learn how to fish (not saying its wrong) but to me, actually doing it regularly beats watching 100 movies and reading 100 magazines (in my opinion)

  7. #7

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    Yea I anchor on my kayak sometimes.. not all the time tho or use a drift shoot, the depth on the drop off is around 2.5m to 7m.. From what I found last visit it ends up being a hole cause sounding around with some other kayakers we found that in a certain area about maybe a 10m or so circle was 7m and everything around it was 2.5-3m.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cape Crusader View Post
    G'day greekboi
    Hard to tell I guess not knowing the depth of the screen shot, doesn't look like snapper to me. I get everything from a mass of arches to individual arches
    Were I fish in SA the fish tend to be in the drop offs when the tide is running and move to the top of the drops on slack tide
    My main technique for catching snapper is to motor around till I've found them and then drift over them. If they are there and hungry they eat anything, including a bit of plastic that looks like a fish or a squid head you left in the boat from last trip. I mostly use chunks of herring or by catch
    It can also be productive to anchor and fish offal berley up, maybe not in a yak though
    Cheers
    Rod

  8. #8

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    If you are doing those sort of K's I would be looking at getting a few good quality, smallish, ultra deep diving lures - things like Halco Poltergeists, Zereks or similar and trolling those along the drop offs and through any patches of bottom that look the goods on the sounder. Might be surprised at just what turns up. Make sure you also get a good heavy lure retriever - they pay for themselves pretty quickly.
    "I soak the worms in rum. The fish love em and the worms die happy"
    "Alcohol is not the solution to your problems...................but then again, neither is milk"

  9. #9

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    Snapper in shallow water are usually very early morning, or late afternoon options.

  10. #10

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    Greek Agori , next time fillet your Whiting leaving the whole frame inplace , place the hook through the bottom jaw and out the top youcan then drift or anchor and i'll tellya way to go for Snapper with either Whiting frame or yakka ...

  11. #11

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    The area is lousy with little sharks at times (and the odd not so little one). If you are going to fish flesh baits, make sure you are prepared to deal with them (or take plenty of hooks). For my money on a kayak it would be option B. I got my education as to just how powerful small sharks are not to far from where you are fishing when I was young (Wello point ledge). Must have looked pretty bloody funny - young bloke on the bow of his tinnie while the bitie destroyed the cockpit. Never lifted another one in and put it down LOL.
    "I soak the worms in rum. The fish love em and the worms die happy"
    "Alcohol is not the solution to your problems...................but then again, neither is milk"

  12. #12

    Re: Snapper guides/books

    I know about sharks.. Best shark in the bay I've hooked onto and got to my kayak was a 2m tiger shark, also caught some smaller reef sharks, whaler sharks, bull sharks..But i've only mainly caught them on flat bottoms not reefy/rubble bottoms and only really caught them on dead frozen baits. @volvo I'll try that next time.. I may go out Sunday and do some trolling.. A good 20knot headwind looks fun with my custom outriggers my dad made me and my big sail.. Last time I trolled around the area I hooked onto a nice size mackerel.

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