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  1. #31

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Still amazing how many new boats you see with the anchor light placed in front of the windscreen in your vision. In the states its common to see a little plate under them to stop the light going downwards. You can easily do this and helps if it shines on the deck in front of you.

    We might complain about the odd spottie shining at you momentarily but whats the reality ? Every night on the roads we deal with this. Some blokes forgetting their high beams are on etc. Its what we are used to on the raods. Its a bit different on the water though coz to me its nowhere near as bad and can be a comfort. If that light is on you for a second it tells you that the other guy has seen you. What Angla said above is exactly right..you tend to use them in a sweeping manner ahead. If i get it in the eye a little to be honest i dont mind that much. Its a little akin to early morn/late arvo on the roads where u can turn into the sun and be blinded but nowhere near that bad. Its just part of "driving" and u look away protect your sight. On the water tho i've learnt its not really THAT bad and happier knowing he's seen me. I dont whinge about the roads at night and peoples driving lights...its far far worse on the roads and we just accept that. Anyone driving in the country has known that blind feeling where the bloke coming at hasnt dimmed his lights...this by comparison is nothing i reckon. No margin for error with combined closing speeds of 200kph passing 2m from each other...what are we worried about on the water ?

    You know they're still out there...the guy sitting in the dark thinking he's sweet or couldnt give a shit. When the new anchor light laws came in it seemed some people were more interested in arguing about the wording of it and/or how to get around it...rather than just accepting it was long overdue and probably the best help we've had for ages.

  2. #32

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    at night , I prefer to have nav and all round lights on and nothing else..easier to see beacons etc

  3. #33

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    That infrared idea sounds like an absolutely fantastic idea. So much so, I just went on to have a look at prices for a waterproof unit. On a U.S. site, rugged cctv, it is called, they have an fully sealed infrared cctv camera for boats called the Atlantis, for $250.00 U.S. dollars and they do ship internationally. I may have to invest in one myself. Cracka of an idea.
    Cheers Richo

    Wethog

  4. #34

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    I use my gps and a blindfold ( to eliminate cabin lights) to navigate around the bay. I know I am in the channels when I start running over crab pots, they act like markers, just like playing pac man.

  5. #35

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Quote Originally Posted by Lucky 1 View Post
    I use my gps and a blindfold ( to eliminate cabin lights) to navigate around the bay. I know I am in the channels when I start running over crab pots, they act like markers, just like playing pac man.
    You dont even need the blindfold cos the floats on the pots in the channel are painted black to make them easier to run over.
    Brendan

  6. #36

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Quote Originally Posted by Angla View Post
    I for one would never go fishing with anyone on a hope that you do not hit something.

    You're a nong

    How much is a torch worth up against the cost of what might happen.
    Have you ever seen a yacht at anchor with a single white light up the mast, it looks like a star but I reckon when you hit the yacht you will be seeing stars.

    Get a light or go when it is light!

    I do go at night with safety in mind hence the search light and before that it was a hand held spotlight.

    You are a right dill

    Cheers
    Chris
    That might be right where you are Chris, generally plenty of ambient light on inshore Sunny Coast to see where you are going. I guess everyone's eyes are different, and no windscreen or clears to contend with in our case

  7. #37
    Ausfish Gold Member Richo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Brisbane

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Wethog, this was the brand I used - they have them on the new CityCats now.

    www.flir.com/cvs/americas/en/maritime/

    In my opinion they far out weighed Radar in close quarters and up to a mile away, you could even see the surface of the water and individual waves. Have a Joystick control, zoom function and a choice of colours to suit different light conditions. Could even zoom in to an individual passenger of another boat. Would be great in search and rescue situations. But like all equipment an aid to navigation and not to be relied on solely.

  8. #38

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    At almost $22K http://www.############.com.au/produ...ProductID=2208

    I am leaning towards running over the unlit tinnie and not stopping

  9. #39

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Yep. Don't think I will be bying one of those buggers any time soon. My hull is 3mm plate steel, and therefore, can afford to hit a jetski or ten. ha ha. On a serious note though Richo, they do look like great gadgets, and unlike the ones that i was looking at, they have thermal imaging as well. Good for when you fall in drunk

  10. #40

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    You would imagine they could be built for a fraction of that if the quantities were large enough. Would be nice to see these on all boats, a bit like air bags, used to be the luxury vehicles, now even shopping trolleys have them.

  11. #41

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    I read somewhere a while back that law enforcement don't want flir technology out in the mainstream. Be buggered if i can find it now though, but the brunt of it was that it has the potential to be misused.

  12. #42

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    there are two main types of flir for marine use ,one is 7k the other is 12k,not cheap but seriously good,on my wish list thats for sure.in the mean time ive installed a remote controlled golight ,bla are now distributing them in aus,very easy to install as the remote control is wireless

  13. #43
    Ausfish Gold Member Richo1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Brisbane

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Just saw your thread Opti and it left me speechless! Niiice! A FLIR would really finish it off, that is if there is still room on the dash.

  14. #44

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    Quote Originally Posted by Angla View Post
    Thanks for that Richo. All is good. I just wanted to give a very pointed opinion towards a safe trip. I know there will be those that travel at night and rely on a little starlight to show them the way and then others with a similar opinion to mine.
    In respect to spot lights shining into peoples eyes on other vessels I would like to tell you how I operate with my spottie.
    The light is a search light and has a very good beam that will go some 2 km. It is remote controlled with a joy stick at the wheel and I will generally have it trained forwards so that I can see some 30-40 metres ahead. The action of the swell and waves means it does go up and down with the bow . Then every now and then I will turn it 45 degrees to the left and then 45 degrees to the right (this takes less than a second each way) to look for other boats in my vicinity, returning to the forward position. If I pick up another vessel in the beam I will identify it very quickly and then keep the light off them. I then maintain an appreciation of their position and travel direction if required.
    If I am travelling in a channel with others then I will keep the light pointing lowest to my front so it is really only showing 5-10 metres in front. I do not use it to intentionally reduce others night vision.
    This light is excellent for travelling in the open ocean in either calm or rough conditions.

    Cheers
    Chris
    so angla, listen to what noelm is saying because considering your meant to be able to stop your vessel in half the distance you can see in restricted vis, how are you going to pull up if you have your spotlights showing 5-10 metres in front of you? I work nights driving a 24 metre fast cat ferry and we get to see a lot of incorrect light configarations but spotlights facing forwards unless used for work or berthing or are compleatly useless, stick to the rules like everyone else so we know what you are doing and where you are heading, and insted of using an all round light try using a mast head light and a stern light with your red and green. and keep the all round for anchoring.
    Thanks Jason

  15. #45

    Re: Travelling in the dark

    When we travel in the dark the sounder and gps are on the dimmest setting and pointing down, we usually use the gps for a heading and then line up the moon or a distinctive pattern of stars to try and keep the night vision at its best.

    If fishing somewhere like Donnybrook the spotties on all the time.

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