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  1. #16

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Ther could be another group as well....?
    What about the Internet (keyboard ) fishermen......LOL...LOL
    Willo

  2. #17

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Quote Originally Posted by Willo View Post
    Ther could be another group as well....?
    What about the Internet (keyboard ) fishermen......LOL...LOL
    Willo
    And what are their attributes Willo...You can't get off the hook that easy.

  3. #18

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    The Steeler

    One who does better bringing a feed home from the co op.

    DoNotFeedTheTrollsAandBelligerent

  4. #19

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Quote Originally Posted by Jarrah Jack View Post
    And what are their attributes Willo...You can't get off the hook that easy.
    Yeh JJ
    I use the term" keyboard fishmen" in the lighthearted sence
    I think we all have been guilty of it at some time.I know I have with me Mates......LOL.....
    Willo

  5. #20

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Then, there is the journalist fisho - or more correctly, the fishing journalist...


    Usually very good amateur fishos from any walk of life, the poor bastards discover that they have to go fishing throughout every month whether they want to or not because they need to find new material to feed the hungry printing machines by a certain date each month, especially with photographs.

    After a 18 months or so, they are struggling to find new material to write after their initial flush of journalistic enthusiasm and so they start dredging out old photos from years ago or start asking people for theirs. It is at about this time that they drop out of regular active participation in fishing chat boards because they can no longer afford to publish anything spontaneously in case they need it for this month's mag - or next month's - or the month after that. Oh, the pressure!

    If they use someone else's photo and don't attribute it properly, through their fault or that of others, some holier-than-thou boofhead will make their life a misery by publicly inferring that they are a fraud.


    They will occasionally try out the most obscure methods or baits or odd lures just to find something different to write about after two or three years because, let's face it, in September, nearly all of the articles by every journalist are about catching flathead, in Summer, it is about spotties and occasionally whiting, in winter, it is about snapper and bream. There ain't much new under the sun between one year and the next about catching seasonal fish.

    In their desperation to find something novel to change the repetitious seasonal pattern, occasionally, they will drift off into topics almost unrelated to fishing, such as reviewing the 4WD that they just bought at "mate's rates" from some opportunistic car dealer. Always favourably, of course.

    Sometimes, the articles might be useful - such as if one of them is a doctor in his day job and writes about skin cancer risks and prevention for fishos. Often though, the articles are just page filling dross.

    If they are TV journalists, they have to pretend that they just went out for the afternoon, used their favourite lure and the fish attacked ferociously, even though they might have been out three f%#@ing days without a bite. There are prescribed cliches for such fishing journalists to use incessantly. "Smashed it" is one that is often to be heard in relation to a fish taking a bait - oops - I mean, the sponsor's lure.


    If they cannot land a fish after three or four days of never aired, increasingly desperate fishing behind the scenes, they pretend that everything is hunky dory by showing the great scenery, followed by details of how to book a trip to such a bountiful location with Joey or Freddie or Scottie or whoever from Blah-blah-blah Charters.


    When lost for something intelligent to say, which happens a lot, they will mouth the old TV fishing journalist's chestnut of "...and that folks, is what it is all about!"


    Occasionally, they will conscript their own kids to pretend that they have never been fishing before until this very day, and lo and behold, they have caught this whopper on brand such-and-such lures or reels.


    If they start giving regular "What's being caught, where" reports, they will usually engage local bait and tackle shop owners to file a weekly report about their area. Of course, these guys need people to visit the area and buy bait. So rarely, if ever, will there be a report saying that nothing is biting. Usually, the reports have the predictability of gravity. For example, has anyone ever seen a report from the Jumpinpin area that did not give vague reports of bream, whiting and flathead being caught at a number of well known locales?


    As they get more fame, some manufacturer of overpriced plastic will sponsor them and forever more, their value as a useful source of fishing information is gone as they will never utter a sentence at a seminar, nor in print, without the name of their sponsor's product being mentioned as the source of all fishing happiness.


    As their fame grows, they find that they can no longer choose whom they talk to. They will be accosted in the street by all manner of galoots who they would never ever want to be seen dead with but must adopt a gracious, always interested persona lest they offend their viewing audience and their media masters accordingly.

    Then, if their ego really goes to their head, they will emblazon their boat with their name and garish artwork and never ever have any peace when they are fishing because they get followed around by people who either want to steal their special spots or alternatively, just bask in the reflections of their celebrity.

    At that stage, they decide that they might as well profit from their celebrity and they start selling merchanise - caps, shirts etc - labelled with some cute slogan and their name - er, I mean, 'brand.'


    Usually, however, they end up buying a nondescript tinnie so that they can potter around anonymously in a few hard-to-get-to creeks catching crabs and bream and enjoy just being mug amateur fishos again...


    ...with bait...


    ...and an Alvey!


    ....and they become human again.



    Disclaimer: The characterisations depicted in this post are fictitious and solely for entertainment only. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.



    .

  6. #21

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    The Old Boys

    Usually 2 old blokes well into retirement,in an old Clark cutter tinny or similar, with a Chrysler outboard,both bought brand new.Only hand lines used in the boat,no rods at all.Fishing line like whipper snipper cord,Both smoke like chimneys and can be heard coughing for miles.They catch a heap of fat gut whiting not much bigger than a WA pilly and are happy as,off home to clean them possibly over some home brew in the shed.

  7. #22

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Hey Pinhead,

    Have a read of what Giffo 65 wrote.

    I think he's talking about us!!

    What a hide! Some of these young whipper snippers have no respect!!


    TOL

  8. #23

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Quote Originally Posted by charleville View Post
    Then, there is the journalist fisho - or more correctly, the fishing journalist...


    Usually very good amateur fishos from any walk of life, the poor bastards discover that they have to go fishing throughout every month whether they want to or not because they need to find new material to feed the hungry printing machines by a certain date each month, especially with photographs.

    After a 18 months or so, they are struggling to find new material to write after their initial flush of journalistic enthusiasm and so they start dredging out old photos from years ago or start asking people for theirs. It is at about this time that they drop out of regular active participation in fishing chat boards because they can no longer afford to publish anything spontaneously in case they need it for this month's mag - or next month's - or the month after that. Oh, the pressure!

    If they use someone else's photo and don't attribute it properly, through their fault or that of others, some holier-than-thou boofhead will make their life a misery by publicly inferring that they are a fraud.


    They will occasionally try out the most obscure methods or baits or odd lures just to find something different to write about after two or three years because, let's face it, in September, nearly all of the articles by every journalist are about catching flathead, in Summer, it is about spotties and occasionally whiting, in winter, it is about snapper and bream. There ain't much new under the sun between one year and the next about catching seasonal fish.

    In their desperation to find something novel to change the repetitious seasonal pattern, occasionally, they will drift off into topics almost unrelated to fishing, such as reviewing the 4WD that they just bought at "mate's rates" from some opportunistic car dealer. Always favourably, of course.

    Sometimes, the articles might be useful - such as if one of them is a doctor in his day job and writes about skin cancer risks and prevention for fishos. Often though, the articles are just page filling dross.

    If they are TV journalists, they have to pretend that they just went out for the afternoon, used their favourite lure and the fish attacked ferociously, even though they might have been out three f%#@ing days without a bite. There are prescribed cliches for such fishing journalists to use incessantly. "Smashed it" is one that is often to be heard in relation to a fish taking a bait - oops - I mean, the sponsor's lure.


    If they cannot land a fish after three or four days of never aired, increasingly desperate fishing behind the scenes, they pretend that everything is hunky dory by by showing the great scenery, followed by details of how to book a trip to such a bountiful location with Joey or Freddie or Scottie or whoever from Blah-blah-blah Charters.


    When lost for something intelligent to say, which happens a lot, they will mouth the old TV fishing journalist's chestnut of "...and that folks, is what it is all about!"


    Occasionally, they will conscript their own kids to pretend that they have never been fishing before until this very day, and lo and behold, they have caught this whopper on brand such-and-such lures or reels.


    If they start giving regular "What's being caught, where" reports, they will usually engage local bait and tackle shop owners to file a weekly report about their area. Of course, these guys need people to visit the area and buy bait. So rarely, if ever, will there be a report saying that nothing is biting. Usually, the reports have the predictability of gravity. For example, has anyone ever seen a report from the Jumpinpin area that did not give vague reports of bream, whiting and flathead being caught at a number of well known locales?


    As they get more fame, some manufacturer of overpriced plastic will sponsor them and forever more, their value as a useful source of fishing information is gone as they will never utter a sentence at a seminar, nor in print, without the name of their sponsor's product being mentioned as the source of all fishing happiness.


    As their fame grows, they find that they can no longer choose whom they talk to. They will be accosted in the street by all manner of galoots who they would never ever want to be seen dead with but must adopt a gracious, always interested persona lest they offend their viewing audience and their media masters accordingly.

    Then, if their ego really goes to their head, they will emblazon their boat with their name and garish artwork and never ever have any peace when they are fishing because they get followed around by people who either want to steal their special spots or alternatively, just bask in the reflections of their celebrity.

    At that stage, they decide that they might as well profit from their celebrity and they start selling merchanise - caps, shirts etc - labelled with some cute slogan and their name - er, I mean, 'brand.'


    Usually, however, they end up buying a nondescript tinnie so that they can potter around anonymously in a few hard-to-get-to creeks catching crabs and bream and enjoy just being mug amateur fishos again...


    ...with bait...


    ...and an Alvey!


    ....and they become human again.



    Disclaimer: The characterisations depicted in this post are fictitious and solely for entertainment only. Any similarity to actual persons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.



    .
    haha Bruce..the disclaimer does not absolve you..I could put a name on most of those characters..especially the last one.

  9. #24

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    There a still a few categories of fisherman not described yet.

    The retired exec fisherman

    The legendary fisherman

    The perenially stoned fisherman

    to name a few.

  10. #25

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Quote Originally Posted by Giffo65 View Post
    The Old Boys

    Usually 2 old blokes well into retirement,in an old Clark cutter tinny or similar, with a Chrysler outboard,both bought brand new.Only hand lines used in the boat,no rods at all.Fishing line like whipper snipper cord,Both smoke like chimneys and can be heard coughing for miles.They catch a heap of fat gut whiting not much bigger than a WA pilly and are happy as,off home to clean them possibly over some home brew in the shed.
    ok TOL...
    you are well into retirement..I will never retire.
    I only bought the boat last year and as you know after a couple of slightly larger ones.
    I do use rods.
    What is wrong with whipper snipper cord..has dual purposes..catch fish and chop the weeds down...I certainly have no intention of buying fishing line that is 0.0000001 mm finer than another...or studying how many bearings each make and model of reel has.
    We both smoke.
    Home brew...yuck !!!!!
    I use bait...plastics..use them occassionally but they are really for the softer type whose smell receptors get a lil agitated at the smell of bait.
    BUT..we enjoy ourselves on the water and have done so for the past 30 odd years so I don't really care what others do.
    BTW..when are we going fishing again ????

  11. #26

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    I like your take on the young d*ckhead. You reckon 8 kg line is heavy lol!
    I wonder what that makes me. Come out in our boat with 8 kilo line and we'll all be laughing at how light your gear is.

    Really highlights the different types of fishing around the country.

  12. #27

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Quote Originally Posted by finga View Post
    You haven't come across the dangler's yet??

    I'm in that category.
    They go fishing purely for the enjoyment of fishing (or to get away from the cook and kids). If they get a feed it's a bonus.
    Easy to spot they are.
    They normally wear a pair of torn old work shorts and a tattered old work shirt and always have an old hat on...even at night (but a beeny is used in colder periods). If you could still buy terry towelling hats this is what would be on the noggin'.
    They usually use a long light rods even in a boat and always, always use an Alvey as a reel 9and as such monofilament line is exclusively used). They only ever, ever fish with one rod at a time.
    Fishing rods are made from fibreglass or bamboo.
    Graphite is the stuff in your pencil.
    Braid is what girls do to their hair.
    Bait is almost exclusively a prawn, or during bream season, chook gut can be (and is usually) used as a prawn substitute.
    They generally have lots of tackle which includes about 15 hooks of 2 different sizes and a Eno tin full of different sized sinkers with a #3 bean been the biggest in the arsenal.
    They always have a thermos of tea or coffee with some home made biscuits within easy reach and in winter they may have a dram or 70 of Green Ginger wine with them to ward off the cold.
    The dangler is usually the person fishing in the rain in winter. Seasons and rain and cold and sandflies and wind and any other nasty mother nature can throw at them mean nothing. They have their Green Ginger to ward off the cold and anything else mother nature can throw down in her fury.

    When they get home the fish is inevitably cleaned and filleted in the backyard and the fish is dried on a tea towel, dipped in egg, rolled in flour and cooked in a fry pan with butter. The back bone is usually cooked as well as this is where the sweet meat is.
    Homemade chips and some sliced tomato is usually the compliment to the fish but mashed potatoes with peas and pumpkin is an acceptable substitute in the cooler months.
    The guts and other left overs are either used as crab bait or buried in the garden to help the Magnolia tree along.

    Also....They never, never, never use soft plastics...and they usually win the River to Mud.
    what you just explained was every fishing trip i ever went on growing up.
    my old man, my uncle and me, the old orange solid jarvis walker rods, bakelite alvey reels, series III landrover with a bottle of stones under the seat just in case it got cold. and yep the terry toweling hat.
    how things have changed, thanks for bringing back some great memories.

  13. #28

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    Quote Originally Posted by eyeskeenas View Post
    what you just explained was every fishing trip i ever went on growing up.
    my old man, my uncle and me, the old orange solid jarvis walker rods, bakelite alvey reels, series III landrover with a bottle of stones under the seat just in case it got cold. and yep the terry toweling hat.
    how things have changed, thanks for bringing back some great memories.
    Who's talking about old memories.
    That was last week just about and hopefully that will be in a week or so with TOL.

    Here's the boat launcher. No...fairdinkum....no bullcrap
    I intend on living for-ever....so far so good


  14. #29

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    They have you pegged to a T

    DoNotFeedTheTrollsAandBelligerent

  15. #30

    Re: different types of fisherman ive noticed

    The Charter Boat Tourist Fisho:

    Fed up with the holiday with the missus and kids so goes off and books up a days charter alone or with a mate from the local caravan park or hotel he's staying at (having met up at a bar away from the missus)
    Loads a 24 pack onto the boat with a cheerful - Hiya mates as he yawns and gets aboard late at 6.05am in the morning
    Tells you how many charters he's been on all round Australia, best fish and 'you should havebeen there mate'!
    Asks the skipper "where are we going, what are we going to catch", and offers the odd joke
    Needs to show he can take the first stubbie while bait fishing ,while others still on coffee or water
    Doesn't watch the crew's demo drop to see how to handle an overhead and then leaves the ratchet on or gets the first birds nest
    Leaves his bait on continually without changing to fresh baits
    Moans about why he's not catching - yet all around him are
    Hits three more beers before 9am
    Usually is seasick by 10am from a headache and finds out 'who else has had enough'
    No pity for these guys - just get em on the boat and as they 'retire' - more space for us!
    Plato

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