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  1. #16

    Re: lures for tailor

    A single hanging behind the treble will throw the balance of the lure out which will cause it to tumble on the cast - especially in breezes that are other than from directly behind. Releasing fish would also be a bugger and damage the fish more than is desirable in most instances. I would suggest opposite facing singles are a better option - see attached pic of 40g Slider.

  2. #17

    Re: lures for tailor

    Quote Originally Posted by deepfried View Post
    Hey Horse,
    What you tried with assist hooks can be done but i dont think its worth it for tailor. You can hold the assist hook onto the metal with one or two wraps of leccy tape down near th bottom of the lure, this way it is held to the lure during casting but brakes away during hookup. You also need a longer leader on the assist hook so it hangs behind the lure. Would be a pain though i think. I think what bondy is talking about is a single hanging behind the treble, well i hope so anyway.

    G'day Deepfried,

    Yes mate, I am talking about a single hanging behind the treble attached to a swivel, maybe I should use two ganged hooks do you think, or just keep with the single option?

    Cheers, Peter

  3. #18

    Re: lures for tailor

    Quote Originally Posted by Slider View Post
    A single hanging behind the treble will throw the balance of the lure out which will cause it to tumble on the cast - especially in breezes that are other than from directly behind. Releasing fish would also be a bugger and damage the fish more than is desirable in most instances. I would suggest opposite facing singles are a better option - see attached pic of 40g Slider.

    Thanks for the info slider

  4. #19

    Re: lures for tailor

    Hi Peter
    I wouldnt use two hooks ganged together if that is what you mean. When i use a stinger i dont use a swivel either. I just attach the hook to a split ring and that split ring goes onto the one the treble is on. Its a bit of a compromise but helps minimise casting problems. Try the double singles with no treble as well, it works well. I use both methods but if i am fishing for a feed and from the rocks around here and distance isnt a priority i use the stinger and treble. If i am fishing for fun and releasing fish i drop the stinger or use double singles but normaly i am fishing for a feed. Slider is right with his lures, that concept rarely drops fish regardless of what hooks are used. I have made a few myself using barrel and large bean sinkers and they work. Might be worth giving them a go.
    Scott

  5. #20

    Re: lures for tailor

    I wonder if this would be worth a try:

    At the hook end of the metal lure you start with a split ring and join a solid ring onto it.

    Then you get a couple of straight shank 'open eyed' hooks of the ganging style (but don't gang them). Or if necessary slightly open the eyes of your preferred 'closed eye' hooks with a centre punch.

    Use two different length/size hooks eg a 4/0 and a 2/0.
    Have them opposite facing and attach them to the solid ring.

    Or, try a two hooks of the same size but one a long shank & the other a short shank.

    Why two different hook lengths?

    I dunno...the mention of a stinger hook in earlier posts just made me think of it, tasol..!

    I thought maybe with the split ring & solid ring combination it would reduce availability of leverage for the fish to dislodge the hook.

    The solid ring would dispel the chance of hooks forcing through the split & coming off, as they might do if connected direct to a split ring.

    What the heck, I might try it anyway!
    "...a voice in my head keeps telling me to go fishing..."

  6. #21

    Re: lures for tailor

    One advantage of opposite facing singles of the same size is that they can 'lock' on to the tailors jaw - one hook through the jaw from one direction and the other through from the opposite direction. A tailor hooked this way, and it happens often, has much more difficulty throwing attached hook lures. The 2 singles also often find separate purchase points which the tailor find difficult to throw.

    You would have casting probs also PNG due to the imbalance the different sized hooks create - different aerodynamics and weight.

    It's not just the leverage that allows tailor to throw hooks, but also the angles that the hooks are taken to when the lure is being thrown around. During headshake, an attached hook lure will travel the full extremity from one side of the fish's head to the other. This reduces the length and 'grasp' of the hook gape that has hold and creates angles that allow the hook to come out the path that it went in. When sliders slide up the leader during headshake, this assists tension on the hooks during headshake and dramatically reduces the changing angles of the hooks. It is the combination of this factor and the lack of leverage that makes sliders so effective. Throw on opposite facing singles of a suitable size and dropping tailor becomes a rare event. Of course, a good hook up doesn't occur every time and especially with small choppers and largish hooks.
    To assist in preventing 'bad' hook angles, it is wise to keep the fish directly in front of you when playing it. Tailor have a habit of leaping and headshaking directly towards shore out of the front of little waves in the swash. If the angler is to the north or south of the fish when it does this, then an angle for the hooks to be thrown is automatically created and lots and lots of fish are dropped in this situation. Walking back up the beach when playing a fish also helps when fish are in the swash by keeping a length of line out that can cushion (stretch and contract) leaps and lunges. Maintaining a firm, but not too firm tension on the fish is vitally important.

    Lindsay

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