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  1. #1

    Dodgy radio etiquette

    went for a quick burn across to the top of moreton this morning, being a beautiful morning there were plenty of boats around. one thing i noticed though was how so many people incorrectly use their radio (vhf) to log in and how they make it so frikkin difficult for the poor guys at the vmr or coast guard and consequently tie them up for longer than is necessary.

    there were heaps of people who just did the old information dump, "vmr bribie this is XXX, we have 2pob, our mobile number is XXX, destination XXX, time of return to XXX is XXX" without even giving the poor guy/gal at vmr a chance to respond or even get the info down correctly and then he/she has to tie up their valuable time going through the details afterwards.

    i guess this is a bit of a winge, but it's also a bit of a thanks to you guys who volunteer in the radio towers and have to put up with some fairly ordinary usage of the radio.

  2. #2

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Hey Paddles ...

    Endorsing what your saying, probably find although the particpants intentions are good as far as safety goes, they probably haven't bothered to do the VHF course that teaches them this and all the rest of the even more important stuff perhaps.

  3. #3
    Ausfish Platinum Member bigjimg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Moorooka, Brisbane.

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Totally agree with what your saying.In the 9yrs I have had my licence, MROCP,I have never had to produce it,makes you wonder why you have it sometimes.IMO it should be part of the safety check the water police perform on vessels.Jim
    Haines Signature "FinaLeigh" 580F 135 Optimax
    CH 81 & 72 VHF

  4. #4

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Whilst I agree, i would rather people log in than not. I have also heard plenty of licenced people who log in the same way.

    Dont use channel 16 unless you dont know you local VMR/CG working channel. My local VMR uses 67, and that is what I use to log in with.

    And as paddles suggests, just remember that your friendly radio operator could be taking a call on HF, 27MHz or another VHF channel, so register your call first so they at least have a chance to answer before you provide details.


  5. #5

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    when you call in, remember to be helpful and state what channel you are calling on.

    eg

    VMR Bribie, VMR Bribie, this is Bribie mobile XXX calling on channel 73, over

    its just helpful for the poor bugger in the VMR or Coast guard radio room looking at 6 to 10 or more radios all tuned to different frequencies thinking, what frikkin channel did that bloke just call in on...

    cheers

    Mick

  6. #6

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    I'd have to say I'm one of the people who have been logging in and goin bla bla bla .... only because I've heard others do it thinking this was the way it was done and am using 27 mHz not VHF and therefore haven't done the course, I'll be changing my ways on that though after this post....

    calling your channel and taking time to give VMR your details are handy suggestions........... can you guys or anyone else provide more details on the correct protocol on logging in and maybe anything else those of us who are more inexperienced should or shouldn't be doing

    cheers c
    CHARTER BOAT, WHAT CHARTER BOAT?

  7. #7

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    g'day spear king, like trueblue has said above, state who you want (bribie vmr, bribie vmr) at least a couple of times, then who you are (this is spear king, spear king) at least a couple of times, then what channel you are using (on 73), say "over" when your transmission is finished and then wait for vmr/avcg to respond. this makes it easier for them to respond to you on the right channel (they monitor a few channels) when they are ready, and also get your information quickly and log you on. they'll prompt you for the info they need ie. pob#, departure point, destination, eta at destination, etr. it'll just let em help us quicker.

  8. #8

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Quote Originally Posted by spearking View Post
    I'd have to say I'm one of the people who have been logging in and goin bla bla bla .... only because I've heard others do it thinking this was the way it was done and am using 27 mHz not VHF and therefore haven't done the course, I'll be changing my ways on that though after this post....

    calling your channel and taking time to give VMR your details are handy suggestions........... can you guys or anyone else provide more details on the correct protocol on logging in and maybe anything else those of us who are more inexperienced should or shouldn't be doing

    cheers c
    G'day

    A typical call might go something like this

    (Note: its acceptable to only call the station you are calling twice and identify yourself once on a VHF with clear reception - but call out both names 3 times if there is reception difficulty of if it is in an emergency. If you are on 27 Meg, also repeat each name 3 times because reception is scratchy at times)

    You: "VMR Bribie, VMR Bribie, this is Bribie mobile XYZ on channel 73"
    VMR Bribie: "Bribie Mobile XYZ, go ahead"
    You: "Good morning VMR Bribie, can you put us on the trip log please"
    VMR Bribie: "No problems, give us your details (they may or may not ask up front for the required list of information"
    You: "Thanks, we are departing spinnaker sound marina now, bound for hutchinsons reef. We have 5 POB, and we expect to return no later than 16:00 this afternoon"
    VMR Bribie: <pause while writing all that down> "Thanks mobile XYZ, we have you on the log, have a good day. VMR Bribie Clear.
    You: "Thanks very much, Bribie mobile XYZ Out."

    On your return back in harbour:

    You: "VMR Bribie, VMR Bribie, this is Bribie Mobile XYZ on channel 73"
    VMR Bribie: "Bribie Mobile XYZ, go ahead"
    You: "Good afternoon VMR Bribie, we are now entering into spinnaker sound marina, can you take us off the log please?"
    VMR Bribie: "Thanks for that Mobile XYZ, we have you off the log. VMR Bribie clear"
    You: "Thanks for your watch, Bribie Mobile XYZ out"

    Above is not absolutely by the book but close enough for practical purposes and you will be considered to have been courteous, informative and appreciative by the radio operator who takes your call.

    Just remember to 'speak' with the radio operator - ultimately you are just having a conversation with him. Do your calls like this initially and get comfortable having a formalised conversation with the radio operator and you'll be fine.

    Also go and do your MROCP training (can be done through Coast Guard Redcliffe) and then once you have done that course you can decide how much closer you want to get to doing it absolutely by the book.

    A few other things: if you don't have a mobile number (from joining up the associate membership), you will get asked for more information, like: Boat type, registration and possibly a mobile phone number. If you use a call sign, like "Spearking", the radio operator may come back after your first call with "Vessel calling VMR Bribie, please repeat your call sign" if they cannot clearly understand you. If after the second time they still don't understand you, be prepared to spell it phonetically "sierra pappa echo alpha romeo kilo india november golf", but to avoid that for bugger all per year and have lots of other benefits, just join up as an associate member with either VMR or Coast Guard. Having a mobile number means that all of your vessel and personal details are already on file in the radio room, and all they need is your membership mobile number.

    I recommend sticking a label inside your boat with your boat registration number - nothing worse than getting asked and having to lean over the side to read it upside down and then get back on the radio.

    cheers

    Mick

  9. #9

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Quote Originally Posted by bigjimg View Post
    In the 9yrs I have had my licence, MROCP,I have never had to produce it,makes you wonder why you have it sometimes.IMO it should be part of the safety check the water police perform on vessels.Jim

    Yep same thing here.

    I'm in SA and recently underwent a safety check upon returning to my ramp. I have both 27mhz and vhf, so one would think that the two aerials would be a bit of a give away. Was asked to produce bucket, jackets, advised that rego sticker was in wrong place, but never asked to produce my MRCOP. What the ?????

    I guess if I had been checked offshore where the VHF is a requirement by law here it may have been a different story, but just surprised that I wasnt asked for it regardless and explains to me why so many wouldnt bother with doing the course.

    Personally, I like the VHF and use it primarily regardless of distance as its clear and there's much less BS as there usually is on the 27meg, but with more and more packages coming out with VHF as standard, I'm sure that is all about to change and there should be more policing of the units / users as a result.

  10. #10

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Quote Originally Posted by spearking View Post
    I'd have to say I'm one of the people who have been logging in and goin bla bla bla .... only because I've heard others do it thinking this was the way it was done and am using 27 mHz not VHF and therefore haven't done the course, I'll be changing my ways on that though after this post....

    calling your channel and taking time to give VMR your details are handy suggestions........... can you guys or anyone else provide more details on the correct protocol on logging in and maybe anything else those of us who are more inexperienced should or shouldn't be doing

    cheers c
    this has come up many times before - whilst Mick is pretty accurate and all you basically need to know, do a search for Subzero's posts on radio etiquette in the Boating thread- contains detailed description of a formally correct radio procedure.
    edit - read this link - http://www.ausfish.com.au/vforum/sho...hlight=subzero

    one of the main benefits I got out of the course was the knowledge that, in an emergency situation, I could confidently make a mayday call and ensure all the correct info got through in the most efficient manner to the rescue services before I sank.

    a lot of people don't even think about this - how are you going to ensure your details are accurately noted when you have a very limited time to relay your details and location etc before going down? especially when you are in a panic...

    learning the correct protocol and the correct lingo might save your life one day.

    also learning how to relay a mayday call - you then have someone else's life in your hands - pretty important stuff when you're under pressure.

    granted, you don't have to 'professionally' log in or out everytime, but knowing the basic etiquette will make the VMR or CG job much easier when the radio's are going off at base. and I reckon its always nice to thank them for looking out for you, when logging off.

  11. #11
    Ausfish Bronze Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    East of Rockhampton

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    When you are out on the water and talking to the Coast Guard or VMR, you must never end your call with "over and out". Using the word "out" indicates that you are immediately turning off your radio and will not be responding to any further calls addressed to you. To use the word "out" will definitely bring confusion to the Coast Guard or VMR. The word "over" is generally used only when reception is poor and the call can't be defined as ended. The carrier wave of the radio almost always indicates when the call has ended by the loud click that is transmitted.
    A huge amount for the responsibility of bad protocol over the radio goes to the TV. A particularly poor example is "Sea Patrol". The dumb blonde uses "over and out" all the time. Donít get caught out by these stupid programs.
    Using the correct protocol with the (marine) radio develops enormous confidence and respect in you as a skipper by your passengers. If you don't know the correct radio procedures, join up with the Coast Guard or whoever and get your licence for VHF. If you have a radio installed in your boat, it should be turned on all the time to the appropriate channel to moniter any distress call or instructions given by the Coast Guard or VMR. Professionalism should equate to safety afloat, well it should be so.
    Eagle

  12. #12

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    agreed, as indicated above, 'out' end of conversation, indicating to the other party that you are not expected to speak again.

    Note: You will not typically hear "out" from the VMR or Coast Guard. They will end their conversation with "Clear" or "Standing by" as they are maintaining an active radio watch.


    cheers

    Mick

  13. #13

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Quote Originally Posted by Eagle View Post
    When you are out on the water and talking to the Coast Guard or VMR, you must never end your call with "over and out". Using the word "out" indicates that you are immediately turning off your radio and will not be responding to any further calls addressed to you. To use the word "out" will definitely bring confusion to the Coast Guard or VMR. The word "over" is generally used only when reception is poor and the call can't be defined as ended. The carrier wave of the radio almost always indicates when the call has ended by the loud click that is transmitted.
    A huge amount for the responsibility of bad protocol over the radio goes to the TV. A particularly poor example is "Sea Patrol". The dumb blonde uses "over and out" all the time. Donít get caught out by these stupid programs.
    Using the correct protocol with the (marine) radio develops enormous confidence and respect in you as a skipper by your passengers. If you don't know the correct radio procedures, join up with the Coast Guard or whoever and get your licence for VHF. If you have a radio installed in your boat, it should be turned on all the time to the appropriate channel to moniter any distress call or instructions given by the Coast Guard or VMR. Professionalism should equate to safety afloat, well it should be so.
    Eagle
    agree.

    I never actually respond after the VMR says 'standing by' - to me, that indicates they are satisfied the call is over and no response is necessary.

    and never say 'roger'!!!!!
    its 'romeo'

  14. #14

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    Quote Originally Posted by trueblue View Post
    G'day

    A typical call might go something like this

    (Note: its acceptable to only call the station you are calling twice and identify yourself once on a VHF with clear reception - but call out both names 3 times if there is reception difficulty of if it is in an emergency. If you are on 27 Meg, also repeat each name 3 times because reception is scratchy at times)

    You: "VMR Bribie, VMR Bribie, this is Bribie mobile XYZ on channel 73"
    VMR Bribie: "Bribie Mobile XYZ, go ahead"
    You: "Good morning VMR Bribie, can you put us on the trip log please"
    VMR Bribie: "No problems, give us your details (they may or may not ask up front for the required list of information"
    You: "Thanks, we are departing spinnaker sound marina now, bound for hutchinsons reef. We have 5 POB, and we expect to return no later than 16:00 this afternoon"
    VMR Bribie: <pause while writing all that down> "Thanks mobile XYZ, we have you on the log, have a good day. VMR Bribie Clear.
    You: "Thanks very much, Bribie mobile XYZ Out."

    On your return back in harbour:

    You: "VMR Bribie, VMR Bribie, this is Bribie Mobile XYZ on channel 73"
    VMR Bribie: "Bribie Mobile XYZ, go ahead"
    You: "Good afternoon VMR Bribie, we are now entering into spinnaker sound marina, can you take us off the log please?"
    VMR Bribie: "Thanks for that Mobile XYZ, we have you off the log. VMR Bribie clear"
    You: "Thanks for your watch, Bribie Mobile XYZ out"

    Above is not absolutely by the book but close enough for practical purposes and you will be considered to have been courteous, informative and appreciative by the radio operator who takes your call.

    Just remember to 'speak' with the radio operator - ultimately you are just having a conversation with him. Do your calls like this initially and get comfortable having a formalised conversation with the radio operator and you'll be fine.

    Also go and do your MROCP training (can be done through Coast Guard Redcliffe) and then once you have done that course you can decide how much closer you want to get to doing it absolutely by the book.

    A few other things: if you don't have a mobile number (from joining up the associate membership), you will get asked for more information, like: Boat type, registration and possibly a mobile phone number. If you use a call sign, like "Spearking", the radio operator may come back after your first call with "Vessel calling VMR Bribie, please repeat your call sign" if they cannot clearly understand you. If after the second time they still don't understand you, be prepared to spell it phonetically "sierra pappa echo alpha romeo kilo india november golf", but to avoid that for bugger all per year and have lots of other benefits, just join up as an associate member with either VMR or Coast Guard. Having a mobile number means that all of your vessel and personal details are already on file in the radio room, and all they need is your membership mobile number.

    I recommend sticking a label inside your boat with your boat registration number - nothing worse than getting asked and having to lean over the side to read it upside down and then get back on the radio.

    cheers

    Mick
    IMHO, pretty close to the money but....
    forgot vessel description and rego number and mobile phone number in the log details. These details can be pre-recorded for associate members for whom the keep records of such details.

    Also, 'out' is how you end a call. It does not mean you are turning your radio off. Just means you are finished talking to that station.

    Jeremy
    "The underlying spirit of angling is that the skill of the angler is pitted against the instinct and strength of the fish and the latter is entitled to an even chance for it's life."
    (Quotation from the rules of the Tuna Club Avalon, Santa Catalina, U.S.A.)

    Apathy is the enemy

  15. #15

    Re: Dodgy radio etiquette

    mobile phone number, vessel description and rego number are not required if you are calling in on a call sign that is your home base mobile number from your associate membership. check second last paragraph...

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