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  1. #31

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Quote Originally Posted by tin can marlin View Post
    Good one fish guts i like it
    TCM,he's just jealous of the motor on the back of Jabba's boat.

  2. #32

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    your going to have to put more bait out than that mate

  3. #33

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    jabba,Are those photos taken on the way back from saint bees.Your boat looks like its going fast even on the trailer.I will come for a run with you one day.Have you got seat belts in it.It sure is a boat that looks like it could eat up big distances quickly.Any way a very nice rig.

    cheers

  4. #34

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Hi Guys,

    We recently acquired our fourth Seafarer built by Lindsay Fry (one of the last)- a 5.9Mtr Vermont fitted with a 2008 Evinrude E-TEC 200H.O. running a 19" Viper propeller, fitted out with Furuno Electronics. It is a brilliant all-round fishing and family boat.

    Two years ago, I acquired an original 1969 Seafarer 4.2Mtr Ventura (originally red) that I went about carrying out a full restoration on, from the trailer up. It is now fitted with a late model Johnson 35 3-Cylinder, set-up for estuary fishing, crabbing and cruising. A great, solid, stable little boat.

    I know the Seafarer product very well and having ridden in V-Sea's, Vamps, Vikings, Vegas, Victory's, Vagabond's and Voyager's, along with many other locally built boats, love the quality of the Seafarer product!





  5. #35

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Those are a couple of very nice rigs you have there OceanSpirit.

    I have never owned a Seafarer, but my father has had a Viking for many years. You have to admire how well they are built and they seem to stand up to the tests of time.

    I presently have a Cruise Craft, another great brand, but would happily consider a Seafarer if I ever decided to change my rig.

    Are they the best boat?; as some others have point out in various posts, there is no such thing as a best boat or motor etc etc , it all depends on your circumstances and needs at the time. All boats are a compromise in the end.

    But the things that I really like about the brand name boats like Seafarers, are that you can see where the money has gone in the quality, they seem to handle the test of time as I have said, and they give you a feeling of security when you use them.

    But the clincher to me is that they retain their value very well, are sought after by other boaties and generally easy to sell when the time comes. A 10 to 15 year old Seafarer will still bring similar money to what it originally cost if it has been kept in any half decent way since new. Of course Seafarers are not on their lonesome but it is still a fairly small and elite group of Aussie brands that have stood the test of time in the same way.

    Thanks for sharing your pictures and details of your rigs with us. Always a pleasure to see a quality rig that is well set up and the owner(s) have obvious pride in their boats.

    Cheers

    Dave

  6. #36

    Smile Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    sweet looking boat andrew,bet it goes great,of cause it would look and go better with a merc on the back.lol

  7. #37

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Another Seafarer for the site. This ones a 2003 Vamp. Nice boat for chasing tuna and macs in, a little cold in winter though......

    Am thinking of changing boat to a cabin though......looking at the Aqualite range (basically a better looking Stabicraft) from NZ. A little safer for offshore work and a little shade for the kids

  8. #38

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Some great rigs there guys,

    Jabba,
    top looking boat, an interesting comparison to my early 80's 5.25 Vermont.

    She might not be the prettiest boat at the ramp these days,
    but as a sea boat, I wouldn't swap her for any other.

    All the original timbers have been replaced with marine ply, new floors with 3/4" marine ply instead of masonite, same with the side pockets, as well as a "you beaut" new transom.
    As you could imagine, this has added a lot of weight, but it has just made a great boat even better, she always did have good manners at sea, but now the ride is even better, she tends to spear across the top of swells now with less bump.
    The Merc 115 carb feed 2 stroke, suits her down to the ground, heaps of grunt for bar crossings, & can push her at 50 knts (miles/ p/h) in the river with little trouble.

    I have full trust in my old girl, enough to venture out to the shelf when we can (23miles east of Ballina),
    we have hit Sunfish in her,
    nearly rolled on the bar during a sea rescue,
    & been literally run into by a pro crab boat 12 miles to sea in her,
    & I wouldnt part with her for the world.

    Who loves their Seafarer???..................I DO

    Muzz

  9. #39

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Quote Originally Posted by nobody View Post
    jabba,Are those photos taken on the way back from saint bees.Your boat looks like its going fast even on the trailer.I will come for a run with you one day.Have you got seat belts in it.It sure is a boat that looks like it could eat up big distances quickly.Any way a very nice rig.

    cheers
    Yeah mate, that's St Bee's... I was up there last July 2007... Mackay is great place, and those islands are amazing. The farthest I ventured out was to the power pole near Calder.... Prick off a ride back home in 25kn winds... I would love to visit again...

  10. #40

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    jabba, all those things you said about getting better the harder you pushed her were true...........read this review.


    Hereís a new recipe for the Aussie boating scene. Take Lindsay Fryís tried and true 5.9m Seafarer hull, finished in either bright yellow or red gelcoat; give it a runabout layout with a low profile double bed cabin; and strap 200hp of Evinrude grunt on its transom and what do you get? An exhilarating day boat that can handle just about anything Sydney Harbour can throw at it at speeds thatíll blow you away.

    And donít be mislead into thinking Sydney Harbour is just a sheltered waterway. Have you ever seen the amazing television pictures of Sydney ferries battling 5m swells inside the harbour? It can get pretty rough out there. Seafarerís 5.9m hull is a true deep-vee bluewater hull and she performs as such, itís only this boatís internal layout that makes her different from her offshore brothers.

    She has an overall length of 6.45m (21í 2Ē) ó including the swim platform ó a beam of 2.4m (7í 9Ē); has a hull weight of 900kg; and an extremely sharp deadrise at the transom of 21 degrees. With a fine entry she cuts through swells and chop, while her large down-turned chines ensure she tracks straight when underway and is stable at rest. Out on the water this boat is a real hoon machine. Itís a hoot to drive, has power to burn and has the ride and smooth water handling of a performance ski boat, but this Seafarer has another ace up her sleeve ó she can also deliver high speed performance and handling in rough and choppy water.

    In fact, as the Modern Boating team found out during this test, the best way to drive this hull in choppy water is hard. She literally sliced through the swells without and delivered a surprisingly smooth and dry ride. Because the hull is designed in a runabout configuration and the low forward cabin sits under the foredeck, the boat retains a low profile making it extremely aerodynamic. The curved and raked one-piece windscreen allows for an even better airflow over the cockpit, which reduced drag even further. The first part of this test was conducted on a windless morning on the upper reaches of the Parramatta River, where the water was glassy smooth.

    In those conditions we were able to run the boat flat strap with complete safety. With the hull trimmed right out, so the boat was running with only the transom in the water, the Vermont hit 49.6 knots at 5500rpm. She was literally dancing on her chines. And that was only the test boat. The camera boat was the same hull fitted with a 250hp Evinrude and she was to be honest, a little twitchy, in a fun kind of way. The team agreed the 250hp engine might be a bit of an overkill, especially when you consider the hull has a maximum power rating of 225hp. Other speed-to-rpm readings were: 7.2 knots at 2000rpm; 8.9 knots at 2500rpm; 15.5 knots at 3000rpm; 28.5 knots at 3500rpm; 34.5 knots at 4000rpm; 39.9 knots at 4500rpm, and 49.6 knots at 5500rpm.

    That was in calm water, but later that day in choppy water out on Sydney Harbour the boat performed equally well. The harder we pushed her through the chop the better she liked it and the better the ride. The boat handled tight turns at speed, in both choppy and smooth water easily, without tail slippage or the steering feeling heavy during recovery. High gunwales give the skipper and passengers a sense of security during high-speed cornering, while the wrap-around windscreen forced the airstream up and over the cockpit, so even those on the rear lounge donít get ruffled. From a personal perspective, I wasnít overly rapt in the colour of the two hulls, but the boatís top performance more than compensated for any problems I might have with colours. ...........................WOW

  11. #41

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    hi guys some very appealing boats there ocean spirit also 2 great looking boats love the little tiller great job on the restoration looks great myself ive 2 seafarers cant rember the models off the top of my head one was a 17ft/6 and the other a 16ft both great boats offshore and inshore .
    cheers shane

  12. #42

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Quote Originally Posted by nobody View Post
    jabba, all those things you said about getting better the harder you pushed her were true...........read this review.


    Hereís a new recipe for the Aussie boating scene. Take Lindsay Fryís tried and true 5.9m Seafarer hull, finished in either bright yellow or red gelcoat; give it a runabout layout with a low profile double bed cabin; and strap 200hp of Evinrude grunt on its transom and what do you get? An exhilarating day boat that can handle just about anything Sydney Harbour can throw at it at speeds thatíll blow you away.

    And donít be mislead into thinking Sydney Harbour is just a sheltered waterway. Have you ever seen the amazing television pictures of Sydney ferries battling 5m swells inside the harbour? It can get pretty rough out there. Seafarerís 5.9m hull is a true deep-vee bluewater hull and she performs as such, itís only this boatís internal layout that makes her different from her offshore brothers.

    She has an overall length of 6.45m (21í 2Ē) ó including the swim platform ó a beam of 2.4m (7í 9Ē); has a hull weight of 900kg; and an extremely sharp deadrise at the transom of 21 degrees. With a fine entry she cuts through swells and chop, while her large down-turned chines ensure she tracks straight when underway and is stable at rest. Out on the water this boat is a real hoon machine. Itís a hoot to drive, has power to burn and has the ride and smooth water handling of a performance ski boat, but this Seafarer has another ace up her sleeve ó she can also deliver high speed performance and handling in rough and choppy water.

    In fact, as the Modern Boating team found out during this test, the best way to drive this hull in choppy water is hard. She literally sliced through the swells without and delivered a surprisingly smooth and dry ride. Because the hull is designed in a runabout configuration and the low forward cabin sits under the foredeck, the boat retains a low profile making it extremely aerodynamic. The curved and raked one-piece windscreen allows for an even better airflow over the cockpit, which reduced drag even further. The first part of this test was conducted on a windless morning on the upper reaches of the Parramatta River, where the water was glassy smooth.

    In those conditions we were able to run the boat flat strap with complete safety. With the hull trimmed right out, so the boat was running with only the transom in the water, the Vermont hit 49.6 knots at 5500rpm. She was literally dancing on her chines. And that was only the test boat. The camera boat was the same hull fitted with a 250hp Evinrude and she was to be honest, a little twitchy, in a fun kind of way. The team agreed the 250hp engine might be a bit of an overkill, especially when you consider the hull has a maximum power rating of 225hp. Other speed-to-rpm readings were: 7.2 knots at 2000rpm; 8.9 knots at 2500rpm; 15.5 knots at 3000rpm; 28.5 knots at 3500rpm; 34.5 knots at 4000rpm; 39.9 knots at 4500rpm, and 49.6 knots at 5500rpm.

    That was in calm water, but later that day in choppy water out on Sydney Harbour the boat performed equally well. The harder we pushed her through the chop the better she liked it and the better the ride. The boat handled tight turns at speed, in both choppy and smooth water easily, without tail slippage or the steering feeling heavy during recovery. High gunwales give the skipper and passengers a sense of security during high-speed cornering, while the wrap-around windscreen forced the airstream up and over the cockpit, so even those on the rear lounge donít get ruffled. From a personal perspective, I wasnít overly rapt in the colour of the two hulls, but the boatís top performance more than compensated for any problems I might have with colours. ...........................WOW
    Thanks for that Nobody, that test review is extreamly accurite... Do you have a link to were you found it....

    That Yellow Vermont in the test review. It is a good chance that is the very boat I have today.... I asked lindsay when I bought mine, how many coloured Vermonts he made.... There are 2 yellow, 1 red and 1 Ford blue... Also sold though F1 Marine....

  13. #43

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    "extremely" sharp deadrise at the transom of 21 degrees

    hahaha, might go hand in hand with the other exagerations within that article. Sorry had to say it!

  14. #44

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    jabba the link is
    http://www.modernboating.com.au/boat...rer-Vermont-59
    or go to modern boating /boat test ...Your right edencraft 223 has made it to no one on google....One last question..What is a chop duster?

    cheers

  15. #45

    Re: Seafarer Appreciation thread

    Hi everyone, some nice boats being posted. I've newly acquired an old 4.75 V-Sea and so far have been more than happy with it. It's fitted with a 97 Johnson 70hp 2 stroke that seems to be well suited. A question that i have is if it is possible to fit an in floor fuel tank up front to counteract my big ass. It would have to be at least 70 capacity. Has anyone done this, and what suggestions have you in regards to moving the tank forward.

    Ta Noiseworks

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