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flattymattyb
17-07-2005, 06:40 AM
Hi All,

Wonder if anyone can help with this. The fuel tank in my oldmans seafarer venus has developed a small pin hole that is leaking fuel, done a quick ring around this morning but can't find anyone willing to weld it up for us, no sense of adventure ;D, whats the worst that could happen [smiley=bomb.gif] [smiley=fireman.gif]. Has anyone out there had a tank repaired and if so by who, or does anyone know of a product to use to seal it up.

Cheers
Matty

Needmorerum
17-07-2005, 08:41 AM
Is there any cracking around the hole, what caused the leak, any idea? One repair that I have done in the bush on a 4WD fuel tank is to screw a S/S self tapper into it with a fibre washer. Was only a temporary repair then, but I think the bloke still has it in his tank now.
May pay to contact a couple of the 4WD outlets and they might be able to help you out with someone who can repair it.
Redland Bay 4X4, or someone like that.

Corry

flattymattyb
17-07-2005, 10:44 AM
Hi Corry,

Thanks mate will try a few of them, as far as the leak goes there is no cracking it appears to have been caused from the area contacting the hull and there being a small "pip" in the flow coat as well as small particles causing a slight case of corrosion. We already have some padding for when it goes back in.

Matty

NQCairns
17-07-2005, 11:25 AM
Way back in my tear away days I broke a tailshaft driving too fast the rear portion spun around and beat the crap out of the fuel tank until I could pull up. The next morning with an empty tank from all the holes I used that 2 part epoxy strip from auto parts stores to bung up the holes. I had that car for a few years after and it never leaked. I didn't prep the area either, straight onto to a dirty tank.

Years ago 100km into a 4000km trip towing a boat my new radiator blew a bracket of the top tank (poor workmanship) ripping a hole in the copper/brass?, I scraped the paint off, roughed the area up with the edge a screwdriver a thousand times and put the same stuff over the area and then ran with the cap loose for the rest of the day. I still have that car and that was 6 years ago patch still working with full pressure always.

In an emergency and a situation such as yours ;D a person could consider softly hammering a 50cent piece sized area around the hole until the divit is a mm or so lower at the centre then roughen the daylights out of it with big scratches and put some of this stuff on after cleaning with acetone or thinners. cheers nq

familyman
17-07-2005, 01:24 PM
Matty try soft soldering with an electric iron or old fashioned copper iron heated away from job.Try to drain the fuel from the tank first.Remember cleanliness is next to easiness.good luck.
cheers jon

Lucky_Dave76
17-07-2005, 02:22 PM
I have repaired tanks with
liquid Steel" you can buy it from super cheap or Repco. You just have to make sure you rough it up, knead it untill it feels hot and press down on the hole....am I still talking about a fuel tank repair? anyway.... ;) This is one of the Safest ways to repair a fuel tank! "No Spark No Boom!"
Good Luck
Dave

flattymattyb
17-07-2005, 02:54 PM
Cheers guys have thought about the epoxy but just worried that with the movement of the tank & boat that it will let go at the worst time but if I can't find anyone to weld it I chuck some on.

Matty

James_V17L
17-07-2005, 02:58 PM
Hi Matt,
"Devcon" is definately worth a look.

Big_Kev
17-07-2005, 03:27 PM
Hi All,

Wonder if anyone can help with this. The fuel tank in my oldmans seafarer venus has developed a small pin hole that is leaking fuel, done a quick ring around this morning but can't find anyone willing to weld it up for us, no sense of adventure ;D, whats the worst that could happen [smiley=bomb.gif] [smiley=fireman.gif]. Has anyone out there had a tank repaired and if so by who, or does anyone know of a product to use to seal it up.

Cheers
Matty

What could happen or why no sense of adventure.
I would say death or serios injury would be the answer Matty.
As James said the best home remedy would be devcon.
No welder would look at this without hot steam clean with an industial strength detergent.
And then it would need to be filled with water to minimse the air space from the heated area.
It is the fumes from the fuel that would ignite and to minimise this is a must.
I was instructed when doing my TAFE to never weld fuel tanks it is easier,safer and therefore cheaper to make a new one.
Hope I have helped. Kev.

Owen
17-07-2005, 03:41 PM
Hi All,

Wonder if anyone can help with this. The fuel tank in my oldmans seafarer venus has developed a small pin hole that is leaking fuel, done a quick ring around this morning but can't find anyone willing to weld it up for us, no sense of adventure ;D, whats the worst that could happen [smiley=bomb.gif] [smiley=fireman.gif]. Has anyone out there had a tank repaired and if so by who, or does anyone know of a product to use to seal it up.

Cheers
Matty

G'day Matty,
I've welded dozens of tanks. Only ever had one go up on me and that was because I tried a new product designed to make them safe to weld (it didn't work). Turned a 60 litre rectangular tank into an 80 litre round one :'( Luckily I was suss about it so I held a piece of burning paper on a loooooong stick to try it.
What you'll probably have to do is take the tank out and have it steam cleaned. This won't always get all the vapors because of the baffles. After that tip a bottle of household dishwashing detergent into it and wash it our with water. Keep doing this until there is absolutely no smell of fuel in the tank. When it's being welded the tank has to be purged with argon so there's no oxygen in it.
You'll probably find the only people that will do it for you are guys that work for themselves or old timers. Workplace health & safety regulations require the use of "gas sniffers" to ensure that there are no hydrocarbons left in the tank. Many people won't take the risk.
You could try anyone that manufactures 4wd fuel tanks or that services fuel or chemical transport equipment. The latter will have the right safety gear.

cheers,
Owen

aido
18-07-2005, 07:37 AM
jon has a good answer for you.
a bit more info then...

my seafarer stainless tanks had a few leaks around the seams
when i got it. soft solder is the go.
clean the repair area up real bright, like with 400 wet and dry paper,
then go with the old soldering copper, the big lump of copper you heat
up with a torch, then apply that to the job.
use plenty of soldering flux and work the solder bar onto the repair.

i was surprised stainless can be soldered so easily.

to make a bird of it i got some 3m ec776 tank sealant and slurried that
around the inside of the tank seams. you might not be able to easily
get the ec776, so its maybe overkill anyhow.
http://www.3m.com/intl/kr/img/adh/adhesives/scotch-grip/EC776.pdf

when your done, pressure test it by putting the filler cap on and pumping
a few psi air (more than 2 or 3 psi might pop the baffles off the tank wall)
back thru the breather line. use soapy water to check for bubbles (leaks)

good luck.

flattymattyb
18-07-2005, 01:28 PM
Thanks guys will look into the sealant options as that seems to be the easiest and safest.

Kev, those comments were tounge in cheek mate, I reliase the risks but thought that I wouldn't have been the first one to strike this sort of problem and someone may know of a company that does it.

Cheers
Matty

Mr__Bean
18-07-2005, 03:45 PM
Matty there are dedicated fuel tank sealants, they are a two part mix.

They are used in aircraft fuel tanks as their tanks are only rivetted together not welded.

Do you know anyone in the aircraft maintenance game? If so ask them for a bit of PR1422 or PR1436, they will know what you mean.

If not, and you don't have success with other means, consider ringing a couple of local aircraft engineering companies, everyone has some in their fridge in the hangar.

What area are you in? I have some in the shed.

- Darren