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Fisheries Queensland
13-06-2013, 10:04 AM
Queensland Government
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

13 June 2013
Mark your traps or they’ll get snatched

Fishers are reminded to ensure their traps are correctly labelled following an increasing number of unmarked traps being seized from Moogerah and Maroon Dams.

Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol Officer (QBFP) Coby Walker said the marking of apparatus in the area was an ongoing issue.

“Over the past few months, 134 unmarked traps have been seized by QBFP from the dams,” he said.

“The seizure of traps could be avoided if fishers ensure the traps are marked and set correctly.

“Anyone who uses a trap must have a tag on the trap showing the owner’s surname and address.

“If a trap is not fixed to something stationary above the water level while being used, like a branch, wooden stake or a boat, it must have a light-coloured float attached that is clearly visible on the surface of the water.

“The float, which could be a two or three-litre milk container, must also feature the owner’s surname, and be at least 15 cm in each of its dimensions.”

Mr Walker said fishers should be mindful of specific size requirements for traps.

“The majority of traps seized are funnel and opera house traps,” he said.

“Funnel and opera house traps must be no longer than 70cm or no more than 50cm in width or height. There must be no more than four entrances, with each hole or ring measuring no more than 10cm in any dimension.

“The trap entrance must be made of rigid material. If the trap does not have a mesh made of rigid material, the size of the mesh must be no more than 25mm.”

Mr Walker said the funnel and opera house traps seized were most likely used to catch redclaw crayfish, which are widespread in the dams.

“It’s important for fishers to be familiar with redclaw regulations in Queensland. Different rules and requirements apply to different regions, and yabbies can be frequently misidentified,” he said.

“In South East Queensland, redclaw are classed as non-indigenous, so no size or possession limits apply in the region.

“It is an offence to return a redclaw crayfish to the water if caught, to use them as bait or to place them in dams or ponds without the relevant permits.

“This also means that egg bearing females and juvenile redclaw must be kept,” he said.

“A maximum penalty of $220 000 applies to those found releasing or returning redclaw to dams or waterways without the appropriate permit.”

For more information about redclaw crayfish regulations, trap requirements and other freshwater fishing rules visit www.fisheries.qld.gov.au (http://www.fisheries.qld.gov.au/) or phone 13 25 23.

Follow Fisheries Queensland on Facebook and Twitter (@FisheriesQld).

Media: Jo Anglesey, 3087 8601

solemandownunder
13-06-2013, 01:23 PM
Is the above ONLY applicable to freshwater ? because if it also applies to saltwater, then we have some questions.....

Thanks, Ray & Kerri.

rayken1938
13-06-2013, 05:03 PM
“The float, which could be a two or three-litre milk container, must also feature the owner’s surname, and be at least 15 cm in each of its dimensions.”
Has anyone got any 2 l milk containers that are 150m across all of mine only measure 100mm.
Cheers
Ray.
Maybe they call the diagonal a dimension.

netmaker
13-06-2013, 05:17 PM
no-one should be encouraged to use milk bottles or any other plastic containers as floats. one prop strike and it is no longer a float and just adds to the detritus on the bottom (along with the trap).

banksmister
13-06-2013, 05:39 PM
“The float, which could be a two or three-litre milk container, must also feature the owner’s surname, and be at least 15 cm in each of its dimensions.”
Has anyone got any 2 l milk containers that are 150m across all of mine only measure 100mm.
Cheers
Ray.
Maybe they call the diagonal a dimension.



You will have to explain what a milk bottle is to old mate who wrote that email, as they probably only serve lattes in his office.

wayno60
13-06-2013, 09:31 PM
one prop strike and it is no longer a float
very good point.

Si
13-06-2013, 09:49 PM
Queensland Government
Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry

13 June 2013
Mark your traps or they’ll get snatched

Fishers are reminded to ensure their traps are correctly labelled following an increasing number of unmarked traps being seized from Moogerah and Maroon Dams.

Queensland Boating and Fisheries Patrol Officer (QBFP) Coby Walker said the marking of apparatus in the area was an ongoing issue.

“Over the past few months, 134 unmarked traps have been seized by QBFP from the dams,” he said.

“The seizure of traps could be avoided if fishers ensure the traps are marked and set correctly.

“Anyone who uses a trap must have a tag on the trap showing the owner’s surname and address.

“If a trap is not fixed to something stationary above the water level while being used, like a branch, wooden stake or a boat, it must have a light-coloured float attached that is clearly visible on the surface of the water.

“The float, which could be a two or three-litre milk container, must also feature the owner’s surname, and be at least 15 cm in each of its dimensions.”

Mr Walker said fishers should be mindful of specific size requirements for traps.

“The majority of traps seized are funnel and opera house traps,” he said.

“Funnel and opera house traps must be no longer than 70cm or no more than 50cm in width or height. There must be no more than four entrances, with each hole or ring measuring no more than 10cm in any dimension.

“The trap entrance must be made of rigid material. If the trap does not have a mesh made of rigid material, the size of the mesh must be no more than 25mm.”

Mr Walker said the funnel and opera house traps seized were most likely used to catch redclaw crayfish, which are widespread in the dams.

“It’s important for fishers to be familiar with redclaw regulations in Queensland. Different rules and requirements apply to different regions, and yabbies can be frequently misidentified,” he said.

“In South East Queensland, redclaw are classed as non-indigenous, so no size or possession limits apply in the region.

“It is an offence to return a redclaw crayfish to the water if caught, to use them as bait or to place them in dams or ponds without the relevant permits.

“This also means that egg bearing females and juvenile redclaw must be kept,” he said.

“A maximum penalty of $220 000 applies to those found releasing or returning redclaw to dams or waterways without the appropriate permit.”

For more information about redclaw crayfish regulations, trap requirements and other freshwater fishing rules visit www.fisheries.qld.gov.au (http://www.fisheries.qld.gov.au/) or phone 13 25 23.

Follow Fisheries Queensland on Facebook and Twitter (@FisheriesQld).

Media: Jo Anglesey, 3087 8601

This is such serious offence by people i cant believe they let em get away with it. They should be locked in the slammer for this action of not putting your name on a float. i cant sleep at night knowing that people are not marking their apparatus. all those unmarked floats just bobbing away causing all sorts of damage and carnage to the environment. guys...something needs to be done.

Fisheries Queensland
20-06-2013, 12:03 PM
Hi Rayken1938,

Under the Fisheries Regulation 2008 an exemption exists to using a 2L or 3L plastic milk container as a float for freshwater traps. Please find an extract from the freshwater trap section of the Regulation to clarify freshwater trap requirements:



185E Freshwater traps

(1) A recreational fisher may use a canister trap, collapsible trap, dilly, funnel trap or round trap (each of which is a freshwater trap) only if the fisher uses the trap for taking freshwater fish in compliance with subsections (2) to (5).

(2) The fisher must not use more than a total of 4 freshwater traps, including any combination of freshwater traps, to take freshwater fish.

(3) Also, the fisher must ensure -
(a) a tage, on which is written the surname and address of the owner of the freshwater trap, is attached to the trap; and
(b) while the trap is being used, it is attached to -
(i) something that is stationary above the surface of the water; or
(ii) a float that complies with subsection (4).

(4) The float must -
(a) be light coloured and clearly visible on the surface of the water; and
(b) be at least 15cm in all its dimensions; and
(c) have written on it the surname of the owner of the freshwater trap to which it is attached.

(5) However, subsection (4) (b) does not apply if the float is a 2L or 3L plastic milk container.


To view the Fisheries Regulation 2008 please click here (http://http://www.legislation.qld.gov.au/LEGISLTN/CURRENT/F/FisherR08.pdf).

Camhawk88
20-06-2013, 06:22 PM
A milk bottle is therefore not in compliance with subsection 4c- it is not 15cm in all dimensions- the first point Rayken made and now confirmed by FQ in trying to refute it.
Who the hell are the government employing for media releases now that they cant get their own regulations right the first time and even when the error is pointed out still cant understand it?

Gazza
20-06-2013, 08:39 PM
Hi Cam,
I think the regs. Point to a min 6"dia. Float m8
1.77 ltr volume i believe , 2 or 3ltr has a greater surface area , and FW-wise, collecting/removing them shouldn't be an issue??

Re: SW usage , i 'used to' use 3L bottles for muddies (imo placed out of the way of others) , but accepted sensible SW probs being caused to other boaties(sw)

Mike Delisser
20-06-2013, 08:50 PM
A milk bottle is therefore not in compliance with subsection 4c- it is not 15cm in all dimensions- the first point Rayken made and now confirmed by FQ in trying to refute it.
Who the hell are the government employing for media releases now that they cant get their own regulations right the first time and even when the error is pointed out still cant understand it?

??????
Cam it's mentioned in subsection 5.
2 & 3lt milk containers are exempt from the 15cm rule.

(4) The float must -
(a) be light coloured and clearly visible on the surface of the water; and
(b) be at least 15cm in all its dimensions; and
(c) have written on it the surname of the owner of the freshwater trap to which it is attached.

(5) However, subsection (4) (b) does not apply if the float is a 2L or 3L plastic milk container.

Aussie123
20-06-2013, 09:09 PM
Milk bottles have been allowed in the Fisheries Regulation Act for years.
Also a lot of these unmarked pots are from people with more than their allowed 4 traps.
Their 4 traps are marked properly and the rest are unmarked so they cannot get caught with over their limit of traps.

Haji-Baba
20-06-2013, 09:34 PM
Hey fellow fishers,

I would just let it ride, the stated milk bottles are acceptable and any discussion beyond that will quite possibly have a negative effect.

I sometimes use milk bottles in fresh water as well as round 150 mm. foam floats. If I am travelling/caravanning milk bottles used as floats are a good standby as floats.

I also have a supply of 4 liter water bottles which do measure but are bulky when travelling and not a readily available as milk bottles. I do use these in salt water and never have a problem.

My information direct from the F.W. Fisheries is that milk bottles are ok.

As you will see in many dams, rivers, pieces of pool noodle are not acceptable.

I would just leave it, as we are doing ok as it is.

Have fun Haji-Baba

Camhawk88
21-06-2013, 01:51 PM
Bugger- that'll teach me to read the full post wont it?

Advice from Fisheries up here a few years ago was that milk bottles and drink bottles are not acceptable- mostly because if the lid isn't on tight it becomes a sinker. I wonder if the sub section 5 is a new addition or if it has been in there for some time and the local guys didn't realise.

Either way- my apologies for the spray FQ.