PDA

View Full Version : 20-22ft GRP Australian made boats with positive buoyancy



thylacene
12-09-2011, 08:11 PM
Was having a discussion the other day, and the question of bouyancy arose. I know that ours doesn't even have neutral buoyancy. So the question is which Australian made fiberglass boats in the 20-22' range have buoyancy ratings?

Cheers

Thy

Spaniard_King
12-09-2011, 08:22 PM
Edencraft Mine is built to survey even under the gunnels is foam filled and sealed in fiberglass
http://www.edencraft.com.au/offshore.html

Jabba_
12-09-2011, 08:44 PM
Im not entirly sure, but I think the Seafarers have positive floation.. Its not foam filled like Garry's Edencraft, instead it has two air tight chambers built into the hull. One on each side running the full lenght off the boat...

cormorant
13-09-2011, 01:51 AM
Gotta laugh when I see boats with positive Boyancy and they use air chambers. With age or accidents and people screwing into them etc are they still airtight? Sort of like inflatable jackest. When the crap hits the fan I'll have a foam jacket thanks. I won't even start on the - is that positive the right side up?

What you really want is a stable in crap condition any way up unsinkeable boat acting as a rescue platform if it floods not a wildly moving cork.

Jakers 69
13-09-2011, 04:29 AM
Most of the Haines boats

PinHead
13-09-2011, 05:13 AM
It is pretty sad when this question has to be asked. It should be standard in all boats.

stue2
13-09-2011, 08:48 AM
What you really want is a stable in crap condition any way up unsinkeable boat acting as a rescue platform if it floods not a wildly moving cork.[/QUOTE]

Do you mean like a cat ;D

Jabba_
13-09-2011, 11:32 AM
It is pretty sad when this question has to be asked. It should be standard in all boats.

Totally agree. My opinion is, all trailer boats should have foam filled flotation no matter there size.

cormorant
13-09-2011, 11:46 AM
What you really want is a stable in crap condition any way up unsinkeable boat acting as a rescue platform if it floods not a wildly moving cork.

Do you mean like a cat ;D[/QUOTE]

Yeah!!!! Upside down with the cabin acting as a drogue you could set up a swag and a chair between the hulls while awaiting rescue!! Stretch a hammock between the props? cough cough on a mill pond which is always when it happens.

Just commenting that floatation in the right spots is good but seeing stuff with foam filled hulls, not self draining decks and water on the deck becomes a real problem - water would be better in the bilge. Under gunnel is good. After a survival platform not just so the insurer can recover a hull. The tests are done in a millpond not in a swell

Dicko
13-09-2011, 12:12 PM
There's been so many incarnations of trying to implement boating build standards to Aus it's getting rather silly. As much as I feel we follow the US in far too many ways, their boating build & bouyancy standards are something we should just adopt "as is" rather than a prolonged effort of mish mashing our own.

stue2
13-09-2011, 09:42 PM
Do you mean like a cat ;D

Yeah!!!! Upside down with the cabin acting as a drogue you could set up a swag and a chair between the hulls while awaiting rescue!! Stretch a hammock between the props? cough cough on a mill pond which is always when it happens.

Just commenting that floatation in the right spots is good but seeing stuff with foam filled hulls, not self draining decks and water on the deck becomes a real problem - water would be better in the bilge. Under gunnel is good. After a survival platform not just so the insurer can recover a hull. The tests are done in a millpond not in a swell[/QUOTE]

Yep, I agree but I couldn't resist