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View Full Version : Question for boaties: Night lights for a canoe???



Damned67
08-01-2008, 06:07 PM
Hi All,
The Son and I typically fish from our canoe, and often pack up and head home as it starts to get dark, which is often when the fish start to bite. So, with that in mind, we'd like to start fishing longer/later/darker. We're not talking overnight or anything, just an hour or two after dusk. My main concern is boats, being that they see us, realise what we are, and avoid us. I was thinking of some sort of LED light on the bow and stern, primarily for the boaties to see us.
Are just a couple of white LED lights going to be sufficient, or should I look more at 'nav' lights, or would that be too confusing on a canoe? (and what do the 'nav' lights consist of??).

Anyway, any tips on making this venture somewhat safer would be appreciated.
Cheers!

timddo
08-01-2008, 06:12 PM
mate you get get those battery operated suction lighs for around $30

they are navigation lights too.

g

peterbo3
08-01-2008, 06:19 PM
Suggest you also carry a decent torch such as an Eveready Dolphin to shine AT boats that are approaching you. Whatever lights you put on will be lowdown & not easy to see.

tiny_tinny
08-01-2008, 07:01 PM
Rather than shining a bright light in the eyes of another boatie, I suggest that you shine the light on yourselves so he/she can see who you are and what type of craft you are in.

Mike

levinge
08-01-2008, 07:06 PM
suction cup lights good and also might pay to have a LED Head set on. That way if a boat is approachin he may see a white light directed straight at him. Also might pay to get some reflective tape for the canoes, as your profile is alot lower to the water than that of a Boat/Runabout. The more visible you are the better chance you will have of avoiding becoming someones figurehead!!!!!

Personally I'd rather be in a bigger boat at night, I have seen what comes out after dark and would not be keen on being in a canoe.

Good luck

Poodroo
08-01-2008, 07:09 PM
When I initially set up my old tinny I set up some nice LED nav lights on it and just hooked them up to a tiny 12v battery that came out of a kids' electric Quad bike ride on. That battery held its charge forever because the LED lights do not draw a lot of current.

Cheers,

Poodroo

seabug
08-01-2008, 07:17 PM
Hi All,
The Son and I typically fish from our canoe, and often pack up and head home as it starts to get dark, which is often when the fish start to bite. So, with that in mind, we'd like to start fishing longer/later/darker. We're not talking overnight or anything, just an hour or two after dusk. My main concern is boats, being that they see us, realise what we are, and avoid us. I was thinking of some sort of LED light on the bow and stern, primarily for the boaties to see us.
Are just a couple of white LED lights going to be sufficient, or should I look more at 'nav' lights, or would that be too confusing on a canoe? (and what do the 'nav' lights consist of??).

Anyway, any tips on making this venture somewhat safer would be appreciated.
Cheers!

If you are out after dark then by law you must have navigation lights.
Not only for your own safety, but also to save someone the lifelong distress that could be caused by a collision.

Lights are Port =red,Starboard =green + a 360degree white light.

Your State Boating Authority should have a free booklet showing Lighting and Navigation rules.

Regards
seabug

Damned67
08-01-2008, 07:25 PM
Thanks All!!



Lights are Port =red,Starboard =green + a 360degree white light.

Your State Boating Authority should have a free booklet showing Lighting and Navigation rules.


I thought that 'nav' lights might be a neccessity. Anyone know if Qld have the nav light rules online? ie specs for the lights themselves?

Fatenhappy
08-01-2008, 07:58 PM
Hi Damned 67 .... (and without deliberately getting too deep .... but!!)

Surely it wouldn't be all that hard to get a couple of the elcheapo BCF suction nav lights and wack them on the canoe. Add to that an all round white light (anchor lite and set at semi reasonable height - above your body / head level ) -- a metre or so on a pole)

The alternative is .... I have a 24" shark cat and don't see you ... your dead for a long time .... hmmm ! As far as I know, all state legislation dictates this as a minimum

Not at all trying to be a smart ass .... but anything at night is hard enough to see, especially when you aren't illuminated..

The age old adage ... "It'll never happen to me!" .... yea right ..... but what about the poor bugger having to live with running you over !!!

Its all good ... I'm sure that $50 invested in your safety is worth every penny ?? And, in the mean time, good luck with your fishing !!!

Cheers
Greg

cammac
08-01-2008, 08:17 PM
i like the idea of the suction lights and a white light on a pole run off a small battery. also i would have led headlamps on as well and reflective tape on the canoe maybe even one of those reflective vests that the main roads guys use - u cant be too cautious i reckon

Damned67
08-01-2008, 08:38 PM
Thanks guys,
We already have the LED headlamps (for our own vision), but I'll make sure to grab some nav lights before we venture out at dark.
Thanks again!

2iar
08-01-2008, 08:40 PM
Thanks All!!



I thought that 'nav' lights might be a neccessity. Anyone know if Qld have the nav light rules online? ie specs for the lights themselves?


Here you go mate.

http://www.msq.qld.gov.au/Home/Safety/Navigation_lights/

Good luck,
Mike

baitwaster
08-01-2008, 08:43 PM
There is a suction 360 white light available at bcf too. If you want any reflective tape, send me a PM - I have boatloads of it and will post it to you for nics.

Damned67
08-01-2008, 09:18 PM
OK, just had a look at the 'requirements' for 'nav' lights, while also pricing them. Less than $50 for port, starboard and mast lights, which is great.

According to the Maritime Safety site, being a non-powered vessel under 7m, all I need a torch to warn oncoming vessels in case of an accident, and an all white mast light if anchored. So, I definitely need the mast light. I'm more than willing to also install green and red.

Now, here's the thing..... The canoe, at it's widest, is likely less than 1m. As a boatie, would the red and green lights being so close together be confusing?
I guess I'll rig them up like some of the trailer lights, ie on a removable board, which means I could make it wider than the canoe itself.........

Thanks again, everybody!!
All the suggestions have been great! Much appreciated.
Cheers.

jacobvz
02-05-2008, 01:39 PM
No

The red and light won't be anymore confusing than the same suctioncup all in one red and green unit on my tinnie


The red and green are right next to each other

Jack

nufin_flash
02-05-2008, 07:30 PM
yeah id just have the red and green in one, that way when a boatie sees me they know your only a small profile to begin with and to pay more attention, you can pick up a white anchor light from bcf thats one a pole and runs on battery really cheap, i got told by them you dont need nav lights if you dont go over a certain speed but then again for your own safety whats $30. as for making the lights wider than the canoe wouldnt that defeat the purpose of having a canoe as you wont be able to get in some of the remote areas as easily

Angla
12-05-2008, 08:32 PM
Damned67,

Have a look at this story I put up a short while back http://www.ausfish.com.au/vforum/showthread.php?t=127298&highlight=advice+on+collision+course

I think that anything that shined a light would have helped to see this guy. I was travelling along with my eyes peeled and scanning the direction infront from left to right. Even a headlight with 3 led's would have been easy to see in the darkness. Twilight may require a little stronger light.

In my opinion, a allround white light should be the least for you to have while stationary. One of those reg/green nav lights while you are under way would be great too as it signifies your movement. Your only fear here is that a boat approaching from the stern will not see this so if you were to wear a head torch on the back of your head then we should see you. ( I think that light shining in your eyes while paddling would not be good for your night vision )

There is an onus on us to be looking at where we are going. Another good suggestion is a air horn which you can get for $20-30. to get the duckheads attention in the event of a boat getting too close.

Chris

DavShmav
14-05-2008, 09:08 PM
Hi Damned67

i used to use a 360 degree white light on a aluminium pole mounted into a recesed mounted rod holder. Pole was about 900mm in length to make it easily visible. As mentioned earlier, websites like ######## or BLA(boating leading accessories) will sell suction mounted red/green lights as a one piece unit. We also used to use a suction mounted 360 degree swivel torch attached to a 12volt battery to help shine the water near your canoe to help alert boats in your area. Most importantly, try and canoe as close to structure as possible at night as boats generally won't be coming thru at high speeds a couple of metres from fixed structure (hopefully)

Cheers
Dav